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  • Author or Editor: Aimie J. Doyle x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there was an association between a history of cribbing and epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE) of the small intestine in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—68 horses examined at the University of Illinois or the University of Liverpool veterinary teaching hospitals.

Procedure—For horses examined at the University of Illinois that underwent surgery because of strangulating small intestine lesions, information about cribbing was obtained through telephone calls with owners. For horses examined at the University of Liverpool that underwent surgery for colic for any reason, information about cribbing was obtained through a preoperative questionnaire.

Results—13 of 19 (68%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Illinois had a history of cribbing, compared with only 2 of 34 (6%) horses with other strangulating small intestine lesions (odds ratio, 34.7; 95% confidence interval, 6.2 to 194.6). Similarly, 24 of 49 (49%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Liverpool had a history of cribbing, compared with 72 of 687 (10.5%) horses with colic caused by other lesions (odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.5 to 15.1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that there may be an association between cribbing and EFE in horses, with horses with a history of cribbing more likely to have EFE than horses without such a history. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:562–564)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effect of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on serum cortisol and glucose concentrations, urine production, and anesthetic recovery characteristics in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses.

Design—Prospective, randomized crossover study.

Animals—10 healthy Standardbreds.

Procedures—Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7% and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]), IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4% and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Serum cortisol and glucose concentrations were measured before, during, and after anesthesia. Urine specific gravity and volume were measured during anesthesia. Unassisted anesthetic recoveries were recorded by a digital video camera for later evaluation by 2 observers who were blinded to treatment.

Results—Serum cortisol concentration was lower and serum glucose concentration was higher with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment. Time to sternal recumbency was longer with MCRI treatment, but no difference was seen between treatments for times to extubation, first movement, or standing. Objective (mean attempt interval) and subjective (visual analog score) recovery scores were significantly better with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication and administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased serum cortisol concentration, increased serum glucose concentration, and superior anesthetic recovery characteristics, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix catabolism in equine articular cartilage explants.

Sample Population—30 articular cartilage explants from fetlock joints of 5 adult horses without joint disease.

Procedure—Articular cartilage explants were treated with control medium or medium containing methylprednisolone acetate (MPA; 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg/mL), HA (0.1, 1.0, or 1.5 mg/mL), or both. Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of sulfur 35-labeled sodium sulphate into PGs, and PG degradation was measured by release of radiolabeled PGs into the medium. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in media and explants and total explant DNA were determined.

Results—Methylprednisolone acetate caused a decrease in PG synthesis, whereas HA had no effect. Only the combination of MPA at a concentration of 0.05 mg/mL and HA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL increased PG synthesis, compared with control explants. Methylprednisolone acetate increased degradation of newly synthesized PGs into the medium, compared with control explants, and HA alone had no effect. Hyaluronate had no effect on MPAinduced PG degradation and release into media. Neither MPA alone nor HA alone had an effect on total cartilage GAG content. Methylprednisolone acetate caused an increase in release of GAG into the medium at 48 and 72 hours after treatment. In combination, HA had no protective effect on MPA-induced GAG release into the medium. Total cartilage DNA content was not affected by treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Our results indicate that HA addition has little effect on corticosteroid- induced cartilage matrix PG catabolism in articular cartilage explants. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:48–53)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research