Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ahmed Tibary x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether veterinarians perceive that theriogenology training at veterinary medical schools in North America and the Caribbean is adequate for achievement of theriogenology skills commonly used in private practice.

Procedures—A survey was mailed to members of the veterinary medical associations of Alabama, Kansas, Pennsylvania, and Washington. With regard to reproductive procedures in bovine, equine, porcine, small ruminant, camelid, and small animal species, veterinarians (predominantly practitioners) were asked to rate the importance of that procedure in their job and to assess their own degree of competency in that procedure at the time of their graduation from veterinary school.

Results—Procedures considered most valuable in practice were those that represent basic theriogenology education and training, such as transrectal palpation of cows and mares and interpretation of vaginal cytologic specimens in bitches. Dystocia management was a high priority in all species. Correlations between rankings for value in practice and competency at graduation were good, varying from 0.75 in cattle and 0.78 in horses to 0.98 in dogs and 1.0 in cats, small ruminants, and pigs.

Conclusions—Analysis of these data suggests that appropriate theriogenology procedures are being taught in veterinary medical schools but perhaps not to the extent required to achieve adequate competency immediately at graduation. Issues requiring further investigation include the effect of tracking in the veterinary curriculum on theriogenology training, methods by which more students could receive greater practical exposure during theriogenology training, and the apparent relative lack of theriogenology training (including contraception) in small animals and exotic animals.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old castrated Arabian horse was evaluated for a history of a right-sided nonstrangulating inguinal hernia that was manually reducable.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed a right-sided hydrocele and bilateral enlargement of the inguinal rings detectable by both external digital and rectal palpation.

Treatment and Outcome—Biportal laparoscopic internal inguinal ring closure was performed with a continuous suture line of unidirectional barbed suture applied with a mechanical suturing instrument. The barbed suture contributed to a secure closure with the added benefit of not requiring knots to be tied at either the beginning or end of the suture line. Follow-up physical examination and laparoscopy confirmed healing of the surgical sites and a reduction in size of the inguinal rings. The horse exercised for 20 months following surgery without recurrence of the inguinal hernia.

Clinical Relevance—In horses, laparoscopic application of unidirectional barbed sutures should be considered among the treatment options for recurrent inguinal herniation. This technique was accomplished with only 2 portals/side, in contrast to the additional 3 to 4 portals that are most commonly required. The use of a barbed suture with a mechanical suturing instrument offered added security to the closure. The difficulties of dual instrument suturing and intracorporeal knot tying were eliminated, dramatically reducing the challenges of performing suture reduction of the internal inguinal ring.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare plasma disposition of alkaloids after lupine challenge in cattle that had given birth to calves with lupine-induced arthrogryposis and cattle that had given birth to clinically normal calves and determine whether the difference in outcome was associated with differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine.

Animals—6 cows that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and 6 cows that had given birth to clinically normal calves after being similarly exposed to lupine during pregnancy.

Procedure—Dried lupine (2 g/kg) was administered via gavage. Blood samples were collected before and at various time points for 48 hours after lupine administration. Anagyrine, 5,6-dehydrolupanine, and lupanine concentrations in plasma were measured by use of gas chromatography. Plasma alkaloid concentration versus time curves were generated for each alkaloid, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for each cow.

Results—No significant differences in area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, maximum plasma concentration, time to reach maximum plasma concentration, and mean residence time for the 3 alkaloids were found between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Because no differences were found in plasma disposition of anagyrine following lupine challenge between cattle that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and those that had not, our findings do not support the hypothesis that between-cow differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine account for within-herd differences in risk for lupine-induced arthrogryposis. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1580–1583)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research