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  • Author or Editor: A. Berkley Chesen x
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Abstract

Objective—To identify indications for and short- and long-term outcome of permanent tracheostomy performed in standing horses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—82 horses undergoing permanent tracheostomy.

Procedures—Data obtained from medical records included signalment, diagnosis, surgical technique, complications, use of the horse before and after surgery, and owner satisfaction. Follow-up information was obtained through a telephone questionnaire administered to owners.

Results—Indications for permanent tracheostomy included nasopharyngeal cicatrix (n = 59), arytenoid chondropathy (55), and laryngeal hemiplegia (20); 54 horses had multiple indications for tracheostomy. Complications identified prior to discharge included partial dehiscence (n = 8), transient fever (10), and excessive swelling (13). Complications identified after discharge included partial dehiscence (n = 3), inversion of skin (2), and stenosis of the tracheostomy requiring repair (1). Long-term follow-up information was available for 64 horses. Fifty-seven of the 64 (89%) horses returned to their previous use, and owners of 63 (98%) horses reported being very satisfied with the results. The owner of 1 (2%) horse was unsatisfied with the results. The 1-year survival rate was 97% (95% confidence interval, 95% to 100%). Mean estimated truncated survival time (ie, failure-free period) was 9.7 years (95% confidence interval, 9.3 to 10.1 years).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that permanent tracheostomy can be safely performed in standing horses and was a viable treatment for horses with obstructive disease of the upper respiratory tract that was unresponsive to medical treatment or other surgical treatments.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical signs, ultrasonographic findings, and outcome of horses with tendinitis of the proximal portion of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT; group A horses) and to compare signalment, horse use, and outcome in these horses with that of horses with tendinitis of the midmetacarpal region of the SDFT (group B horses).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—12 group A horses and 22 group B horses.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, horse use, and outcome information; data for group A horses also included severity of lameness, diagnostic results, and treatment.

Results—Most group A horses were aged (mean, 18 years; median, 17 years; range, 11 to 23 years) Quarter Horses (9/12 horses) and had a grade 3 or 4 (on a scale from 1 to 5) forelimb lameness. Most group A horses (8/12 horses) had positive reactions to carpal flexion and were (9/12 horses) sound following ulnar nerve blocks. Ultrasonographic evaluation revealed hypoechoic SDFT lesions (median echogenicity score, 3/4; median fiber alignment score, 3/3; and mean length, 9.75 cm). Group A horses were significantly older and had a poorer outcome for return to previous use (2/12 horses), compared with group B horses (median age, 5 years; 10/22 horses returned to previous use). Thirteen of 22 group B horses were Thoroughbreds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tendinitis of the proximal portion of the SDFT was a cause of lameness in aged performance horses; prognosis for return to previous use was poor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association