Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert C. Rosenthal x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The role of l-asparaginase (l-asp) in limiting signs of methotrexate (mtx) toxicosis was studied. Eight dogs were randomly allotted to 2 groups of 4 dogs. All dogs were given 400 iu of l-asp/kg of body weight im, on day 1. On day 10, group-1 dogs were given 3 mg of mtx/kg, iv, and group-2 dogs were given 6 mg of mtx/kg, iv. All dogs were given 400 iu of l-asp/kg, im, 24 hours later (on day 11). One group-2 dog was euthanatized on day 16 because of severe gastrointestinal signs that were unresponsive to treatment. A second dose of mtx, identical to that given on day 10, was given on day 20 to each surviving dog, followed by l-asp on day 21. On day 67, the 7 surviving dogs were given 3 mg of mtx/kg, iv. Adverse reactions observed were vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal side effects of mtx were not attenuated with l-asp and would be a serious limitation to use of mtx administered at an intermediate dose in the treatment of lymphoma in dogs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical response and toxic effects of cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2- diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP) administered IV at escalating doses to cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Animals—18 cats with oral SCC.

Procedure—Cats that failed to respond to conventional treatment or had nonresectable tumors were included. Data included a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, cytologic examination of a fineneedle aspirate of enlarged lymph nodes, and thoracic and oral radiographs for clinical staging. A starting dose (75 to 100 mg/m2 of L-NDDP) was administered IV. At 21-day intervals, subsequent doses increased by the rate of 5 or 10 mg/m2. Response was evaluated every 21 days by tumor measurement and thoracic radiography. Quality of life was assessed by owners, using a performance status questionnaire.

Results—On average, cats received 2 treatments. Toxicoses included an intermittent, acute anaphylactoid- parasympathomimetic reaction, lethargy or sedation (≤ 24 hours), inappetence or signs of depression (≤ 72 hours), mild to moderate increase in hepatic enzyme activity, and melena. Pulmonary, renal, or hematopoietic abnormalities were not evident. Performance status surveys indicated normal behavior and grooming or decreased activity and self-care (19/20 assessments), ate well with or without assistance (15/20), and did not lose weight (15/20). Median survival time was 59.8 days (mean, 54.1 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—L-NDDP was ineffective for treatment of cats with oral SCC. None of the cats had a complete or partial remission. Acute toxicoses and poor therapeutic response limit therapeutic usefulness of L-NDDP in cats, unless dosage, frequency, and administration procedures can be improved. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 791–795)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate safety and efficacy of LDI-100, a preparation containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in the treatment of dogs with mast cell tumors and to compare results with those from a control group receiving single-agent vinblastine.

Animals—95 dogs with measurable grade II or III mast cell tumors.

Procedures—Dogs were randomized to receive either LDI-100 (1.35 ng of BCG and 2 units of hCG, SC, q 24 h) or vinblastine (2 mg/m2, IV, q 1 wk) for 6 weeks. Tumors were measured at baseline and day 42, and dogs were monitored for signs of toxicosis. Clinical performance scores were recorded at each visit. Differences in host factors (sex, weight, and age), clinical performance score, tumor response, and adverse events were analyzed.

Results—46 dogs received LDI-100, and 49 dogs received vinblastine. No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups with regard to host factors or clinical performance score. Tumor response (≥50% reduction) rates were similar between the LDI-100 and vinblastine group (28.6% and 11.7%, respectively). Dogs in the LDI-100 group had significantly less neutropenia than the vinblastine group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—hCG and BCG have immunomodulatory and antitumor effects against a variety of malignancies in humans and dogs. In this study, LDI-100 provided clinical responses comparable to single-agent vinblastine chemotherapy but without myelosuppression. LDI-100 is a promising new agent that should be further investigated for multimodality therapy of mast cell tumors in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research