Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Meera C. Heller x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter (PTC) for urinary bladder drainage in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 43 goats, 10 sheep, and 16 potbellied pigs (all males) with obstructive urolithiasis evaluated at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

PROCEDURES Medical records of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs examined because of obstructive urolithiasis from January 2000 through December 2014 were reviewed. Records of animals for which a standard PTC had been placed into the urinary bladder as part of disease management were selected. Data were collected regarding signalment, complications associated with PTC placement, and duration of PTC placement prior to removal.

RESULTS 42 of 43 goats, 5 of 10 sheep, and all potbellied pigs were castrated. Median (range) duration of PTC placement was 2 (1 to 4) days for goats, 1 (1 to 4) day for sheep, and 1 (1 to 3) day for potbellied pigs. Complications associated with PTC placement included blockage of the catheter by urine sediment, perforation of the cecum, and migration of the catheter out of the urinary bladder.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of a PTC into the urinary bladder allowed for effective stabilization of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis while acid-base and electrolyte imbalances were corrected. Use of a PTC should be considered for urinary bladder drainage during medical management or prior to surgical management of obstructive urolithiasis for these species.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics of sodium iodide (NaI) following oral administration to preweaned dairy calves, and to assess the efficacy of NaI for prevention of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

ANIMALS

434 healthy preweaned dairy calves.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 experimental trials, each of 7 calves received NaI (20 mg/kg, PO) once. Blood and nasal fluid samples were collected at predetermined times before (baseline) and for 72 hours after NaI administration for determination of iodine concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis. In the second trial, 427 calves at a calf-raising facility were randomly assigned to receive NaI (20 mg/kg, PO, 2 doses 72 hours apart; n = 211) or serve as untreated controls (216). Health outcomes were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

For all 7 calves in the pharmacokinetic trial, the iodine concentration in both serum and nasal fluid samples was significantly increased from the baseline concentration and exceeded the presumed therapeutic iodine concentration (6.35 μg/mL) throughout the sampling period. In the on-farm trial, the odds of being treated for BRD before weaning for NaI-treated calves were twice those for control calves (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 to 3.00).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that, although oral administration of NaI (20 mg/kg) to preweaned dairy calves achieved iodine concentrations presumed to be effective in both serum and nasal fluid, it was not effective for prevention of BRD in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence of tubular genital tract neoplasia in does evaluated at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals; describe the main clinical, surgical, and histopathologic or necropsy findings in affected does; and assess factors potentially associated with short-term prognosis in these animals.

ANIMALS

42 does.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were searched to identify does with neoplasia of the tubular genital tract. Signalment; history; physical and diagnostic imaging results; biopsy, surgery, and necropsy findings; and short-term outcome were recorded. Age and breed frequencies for the sample were compared with those of the overall hospital population, and variables of interest were tested for associations with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma and with short-term outcome by statistical methods.

RESULTS

Median age at hospital admission (10 years) was greater for the study sample than for the general hospital population (2 years). Pygmy goats were overrepresented (22/42 [52%]). Common reasons for evaluation were bloody vaginal discharge or hematuria and abdominal straining. Adenocarcinoma (13/42 [31%]), leiomyoma (13 [31%]), and leiomyosarcoma (11 [26%]) were the most common tumors. Does with distant metastasis had greater odds of a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (OR, 40.5) than does without distant metastasis. In the analysis adjusted for hemorrhagic discharge, odds of euthanasia for does with straining were 13 times those for does without straining. In the analysis adjusted for straining status, does with hemorrhagic discharge had almost 7 times the odds of euthanasia for does without this finding. The survival-to-discharge rate was low (13/42 [31%]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The frequency of adenocarcinomas in the study sample was unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to confirm the study findings.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize injuries and describe medical management and clinical outcomes of goats, sheep, and pigs treated at a veterinary medical teaching hospital for burn injuries sustained during wildfires.

ANIMALS

Goats (n = 9), sheep (12), and pigs (7) that sustained burn injuries from wildfires.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify goats, sheep, and pigs that had burn injuries associated with California wildfires in 2006, 2015, and 2018. Data regarding signalment, physical examination findings, treatments, clinical outcomes, time to discharge from the hospital, and reasons for death or euthanasia were recorded.

RESULTS

The eyes, ears, nose, mouth, hooves, perineum, and ventral aspect of the abdomen were most commonly affected in both goats and sheep. In pigs, the ventral aspect of the abdomen, distal limb extremities, ears, and tail were most commonly affected. The median (range) time to discharge from the hospital for goats and pigs was 11 (3 to 90) and 85.5 (54 to 117) days, respectively. One of 9 goats, 12 of 12 sheep, and 5 of 7 pigs died or were euthanized. Laminitis and devitalization of distal limb extremities were common complications (13/28 animals) and a common reason for considering euthanasia in sheep and pigs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Burn injuries in small ruminants and pigs required prolonged treatment in some cases. Results suggested prognosis for survival may be more guarded for sheep and pigs with burn injuries than for goats; however, further research is needed to confirm these findings.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association