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Summary

Hepatobiliary scintigraphy provides a noninvasive assessment of hepatobiliary structure and function, and has been used extensively in people. Hepatocellular measurements determined in the cats of this study include cardiac washout (≤ 2 minutes) and time of maximal hepatic activity (≤ 5 minutes) and hepatic washout (≤ 30 minutes). The gallbladder response to synthetic cholecystokinin was determined to be ≤ 3 minutes. Additional measurements also were identified. Potential use of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in feline medicine is discussed.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Ultrasonography of the ovaries of 10 bitches was performed daily, using a 7.5-Mhz transducer with a built-in stand-off pad, from the onset of proestrus until the onset of metestrus. Ovarian size, shape, location, echogenicity, follicular development, and apparent ovulation were monitored. Blood samples were collected twice daily for luteinizing hormone determination and daily for progesterone determination. Vaginal smears were made daily for cytologic evaluation. Ultrasonograms were evaluated independent of hormonal and cytologic data, and the day of ovulation was noted. Initially, the ovaries were uniform and had an echogenicity that was equal to or slightly greater than that of the renal cortex. Follicles appeared as focal hypoechoic to anechoic rounded structures. Ovaries were easier to identify as follicular development progressed. Ovarian size increased with time. Apparent ovulation was characterized by a decrease in number of follicles seen from 1 day to the next, but 1 or more follicles remained in at least 1 ovary of 7 of 10 bitches. The ovaries had an oval shape that became rounded after ovulation. At some time after ovulation, all bitches had cystic (anechoic) structures indistinguishable from follicles. These structures increased in echogenicity and decreased in size with time and may have been follicles that did not ovulate, corpora hemorrhagica, fluid-filled corpora lutea, or cyctic luteinized follicles. Time of ovulation determined by ultrasonography paralleled that predicted on the basis of hormonal data in 9 of 10 bitches and with cytologic findings in all bitches.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of an extract of Serenoa repens on dogs with prostatic hyperplasia.

Animals—20 mature male dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Procedure—Dogs were assigned to 3 comparable groups on the basis of prostatic volume per kg of body weight and degree of prostatic hyperplasia determined histologically. Dogs in 2 groups were treated for 91 days (8 received 500 mg, PO, q 8 h [1,500 mg/d], and 6 received 100 mg, PO, q 8 h [300 mg/d]). The control group of 6 dogs did not receive medication. Effects of treatment on prostatic volume, prostatic weight, prostatic histologic characteristics, radiographic and ultrasonographic assessment of prostatic size, results of CBC, serum biochemical analyses, and urinalysis, serum testosterone concentration, and semen characteristics were determined. At the termination of the study, all dogs were euthanatized, and necropsies were performed. Investigators conducting tests and interpreting results were not aware of treatment group of each dog.

Results—Treatment did not affect prostatic weight, prostatic volume, or prostatic histologic scores, libido, semen characteristics, radiographs of the caudal portion of the abdomen, prostatic ultrasonographs, or serum testosterone concentrations. Results of CBC, serum biochemical analyses or urinalysis, and body weights did not change during treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with an extract of S repens for 91 days did not significantly affect the prostate gland of dogs. Adverse effects were not evident. Although products containing extracts of S repens are widely advertised for men with prostatic hyperplasia, beneficial or harmful effects of this plant extract were not found in dogs with prostatic hyperplasia. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:880–885)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research