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  • Author or Editor: Linda B. Lehmkuhl x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine survival times in dogs with severe subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) treated by means of balloon valvuloplasty or with atenolol, a β-adrenoceptor blocking drug.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—38 dogs < 24 months old with severe SAS (peak systolic pressure gradient ≥ 80 mm Hg).

Procedure—10 dogs underwent balloon valvuloplasty and were reexamined 6 weeks later to determine the feasibility of the procedure. The remaining 28 dogs were randomly assigned to undergo balloon valvuloplasty (n = 15) or to be treated with atenolol long term (13) and were reexamined annually for 9 years or until the time of death.

Results—For the first 10 dogs, mean pressure gradient 6 weeks after balloon valvuloplasty (mean ± SD, 119 ± 32.6 mm Hg) was significantly decreased, compared with mean baseline pressure gradient (167 ± 40.1 mm Hg). Median survival time for dogs that underwent balloon valvuloplasty (55 months) was not significantly different from median survival time for dogs treated with atenolol (56 months).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that balloon valvuloplasty can result in a significant decrease in the peak systolic pressure gradient in dogs with severe SAS, at least for the short term. No clear benefit in survival times was seen for dogs that underwent balloon valvuloplasty versus dogs that were treated with atenolol. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:420–424)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the coding region of the cardiac actin gene in Doberman Pinschers with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) for mutations that could be responsible for the development of the condition

Animals—28 dogs (16 Doberman Pinschers with DCM and 12 mixed-breed control dogs).

Procedure—Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each dog for DNA extraction. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed to amplify canine exonic regions, using the sequences of exons 2 to 6 of the cardiac actin gene. Single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis was performed for each exon with all samples. Autoradiographs were analyzed for banding patterns specific to affected dogs. The DNA sequencing was performed on a selected group of affected and control dogs.

Results—Molecular analysis of exons 2 to 6 of the cardiac actin gene did not reveal any differences in base pairs between affected dogs and control dogs selected for DNA evaluation.

Conclusions—Mutations in exons 5 and 6 of the cardiac actin gene that have been reported in humans with familial DCM do not appear to be the cause of familial DCM in Doberman Pinschers. Additionally, evaluation of exons 2 to 6 for causative mutations did not reveal a cause for inherited DCM in these Doberman Pinschers. Although there is evidence that DCM in Doberman Pinschers is an inherited problem, a molecular basis for this condition remains unresolved. Evaluation of other genes coding for cytoskeletal proteins is warranted. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:33–36)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis on paraffin-embedded myocardium from dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and dogs with myocarditis to screen for canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus.

Sample Population—Myocardial specimens from 18 dogs with an antemortem diagnosis of DCM and 9 dogs with a histopathologic diagnosis of myocarditis were evaluated.

Procedure—Paraffin-embedded myocardial specimens were screened for viral genome by PCR analysis. Positive-control specimens were developed from cell cultures as well as paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from dogs with clinical and histopathologic diagnoses of viral infection with canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus. The histologic characteristics of all myocardial specimens were classified regarding extent, location, and type of inflammation and fibrosis.

Results—Canine adenovirus type 1 was amplified from 1 specimen from a dog with DCM. Canine parvovirus, adenovirus type 2, and herpesvirus were not amplified from any myocardial specimens. Histologic analysis of specimens from dogs with DCM revealed variable amounts of fibrosis; myocardial inflammation was observed in 1 affected dog. Histopathologic analysis of specimens from dogs with myocarditis disclosed variable degrees of inflammation and fibrosis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Viral agents canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus are not commonly associated with DCM or active myocarditis in dogs. Additional studies evaluating for nucleic acid from viruses that less commonly affect dogs or different types of infectious agents may be warranted to gain insight into the cause of DCM and myocarditis in dogs. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62: 130–135)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure QT interval duration and QT dispersion in Boxers and to determine whether QT variables correlate with indices of disease severity in Boxers with familial ventricular arrhythmias, including the number of ventricular premature complexes per day, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening.

Animals—25 Boxers were evaluated by ECG and echocardiography.

Procedure—The QT interval duration was measured from 12-lead ECG and corrected for heart rate (QTc), using Fridericia's formula. The QT and QTc were calculated for each lead, from which QT and QTc dispersion were determined. Echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory ECG were performed to evaluate for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening were determined and used as indices of disease severity.

Results—There was no correlation between any QT variable and total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, or fractional shortening. No difference between QT dispersion and QTc dispersion was identified, and correction for heart rate did not affect the results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—QT interval duration and dispersion did not correlate with indices of disease severity for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Heart rate correction of the QT interval did not appear to be necessary for QT dispersion calculation in this group of dogs. QT dispersion does not appear to be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of familial ventricular arrhythmias of Boxers. Identification of affected individuals at risk for sudden death remains a challenge in the management of this disease. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1481–1485)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the potential importance of dystrophin, α-sarcoglycan (adhalin), and β-dystroglycan, by use of western blot analysis, in several breeds of dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

Sample Population—Myocardial samples obtained from 12 dogs were evaluated, including tissues from 7 dogs affected with dilated cardiomyopathy, 4 control dogs with no identifiable heart disease (positive control), and 1 dog affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (negative control for dystrophin). Of the affected dogs, 4 breeds were represented (Doberman Pinscher, Dalmatian, Bullmastiff, and Irish Wolfhound).

Procedure—Western blot analysis was used for evaluation of myocardial samples obtained from dogs with and without dilated cardiomyopathy for the presence of dystrophin and 2 of its associated glycoproteins, α-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan.

Results—Detectable differences were not identified between dogs with and without myocardial disease in any of the proteins evaluated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Abnormalities in dystrophin, α-sarcoglycan, and β-dystroglycan proteins were not associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy in the dogs evaluated in this study. In humans, the development of molecular biological techniques has allowed for the identification of specific causes of dilated cardiomyopathy that were once considered to be idiopathic. The use of similar techniques in veterinary medicine may aid in the identification of the cause of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs, and may offer new avenues for therapeutic intervention. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:67–71)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration is useful in discriminating between cardiac and noncardiac (ie, primary respiratory tract disease) causes of respiratory signs (ie, coughing, stertor, stridor, excessive panting, increased respiratory effort, tachypnea, or overt respiratory distress) in dogs.

Design—Multicenter cross-sectional study.

Animals—115 dogs with respiratory signs.

Procedures—Dogs with respiratory signs were solicited for study. Physical examination, thoracic radiography, and echocardiography were used to determine whether respiratory signs were the result of cardiac (ie, congestive heart failure) or noncardiac (ie, primary respiratory tract disease) causes. Serum samples for NT-proBNP assay were obtained at time of admission for each dog. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine the ability of serum NT-proBNP concentration to discriminate between cardiac and noncardiac causes of respiratory signs.

Results—Serum NT-proBNP concentration was significantly higher in dogs with cardiac versus noncardiac causes of respiratory signs. In dogs with primary respiratory tract disease, serum NT-proBNP concentration was significantly higher in those with concurrent pulmonary hypertension than in those without. A serum NT-proBNP cutoff concentration > 1,158 pmol/L discriminated between dogs with congestive heart failure and dogs with primary respiratory tract disease with a sensitivity of 85.5% and a specificity of 81.3%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Measuring serum NT-proBNP concentration in dogs with respiratory signs helps to differentiate between congestive heart failure and primary respiratory tract disease as an underlying cause.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy of long-term enalapril administration in delaying the onset of congestive heart failure (CHF).

Design—Placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter, randomized trial.

Animals—124 dogs with compensated mitral valve regurgitation (MR).

Procedures—Dogs randomly assigned to receive enalapril or placebo were monitored for the primary endpoint of onset of CHF for ≤ 58 months. Secondary endpoints included time from study entry to the combined endpoint of CHF-all-cause death; number of dogs free of CHF at 500, 1,000, and 1,500 days; and mean number of CHF-free days.

Results—Kaplan-Meier estimates of the effect of enalapril on the primary endpoint did not reveal a significant treatment benefit. Chronic enalapril administration did have a significant benefit on the combined endpoint of CHF-all-cause death (benefit was 317 days [10.6 months]). Dogs receiving enalapril remained free of CHF for a significantly longer time than those receiving placebo and were significantly more likely to be free of CHF at day 500 and at study end.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chronic enalapril treatment of dogs with naturally occurring, moderate to severe MR significantly delayed onset of CHF, compared with placebo, on the basis of number of CHF-free days, number of dogs free of CHF at days 500 and study end, and increased time to a combined secondary endpoint of CHF-all-cause death. Improvement in the primary endpoint, CHF-free survival, was not significant. Results suggest that enalapril modestly delays the onset of CHF in dogs with moderate to severe MR.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association