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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 3-year-old and a 7-year-old spayed female rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were evaluated because of digestive stasis associated with renal asymmetry.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Neoplasia of the right kidney was diagnosed via cytologic analysis in the 3-year-old rabbit. Ureterolithiasis of the left kidney was diagnosed via abdominal ultrasonography in the 7-year-old rabbit. To evaluate whether unilateral nephrectomy was indicated, evaluation of glomerular filtration rate by dynamic CT (CT-GFR) was performed on both rabbits. On the basis of the functional and morphological CT-GFR results, radical nephrectomy was recommended for the rabbit with renal neoplasia whereas a more conservative approach was recommended for the other rabbit.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The rabbit with renal neoplasia underwent radical nephrectomy without complication. The rabbit with ureterolithiasis underwent ureteral stent placement, and the renal pelvic dilatation resolved. Both rabbits maintained unremarkable serum urea and creatinine concentrations after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE GFR is a highly useful and reliable variable for the evaluation of renal function but is difficult to assess with routine clinical laboratory tests. The CT-GFR technique described here was quickly performed, was technically suitable for rabbits, and provided clinically relevant information. Studies are required to establish reference values for CT-GFR in rabbits.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To measure the minimal joint space width (mJSW) in caudocranial radiographic views of orthopedically normal femorotibial joints of horses, to compare the accuracy of measurements with those of a software program designed for humans, and to identify the ideal caudocranial radiographic projection angle for mJSW measurement.

ANIMALS 12 healthy mares (22 femorotibial joints) and 3 equine cadavers (6 stifle joints).

PROCEDURES Caudocranial views of femorotibial joints were acquired in the proximodistal plane at 5°, 10°, and 15° (caudo-5°-proximal-craniodistal oblique, 10°, and 15°) and lateromedial plane (caudo-10°-proximo-5°-lateral-craniodistomedial oblique and caudo-10°-proximo-5°-medial-craniodistolateral oblique). The mJSWs of medial and lateral femorotibial joint compartments were measured manually by 2 evaluators and automatically by a digital analysis software program. Interevaluator reproducibility was assessed. Post hoc tests were used to identify the projection angle that provided the largest measurements. Validation of mJSW measurements was performed by evaluation of 6 stifle joints ex vivo.

RESULTS Excellent agreement was achieved between the 2 evaluators and between the veterinary radiologist and the analysis software for the medial and lateral compartments of femorotibial joints. Angle of caudocranial view in the proximodistal but not lateromedial plane had a significant effect on the medial compartment mJSW measurements. Mean mJSW for the medial compartment was significantly higher for the caudoproximal-craniodistal oblique projection made at 10° from the horizontal than for other angles. Angle had no significant effect on mean mJSW for the lateral compartment. Agreement between automated measurements of mJSW in the medial compartment and thickness of nonmineralized cartilage in histologic preparations of associated tissues was excellent.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Measurements of mJSW in the medial compartment of femorotibial joints, the most common site of osteoarthritis in horses, were reproducible and optimal with a caudoproximal-craniodistal oblique radiographic projection made at 10° from the horizontal. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:127–136)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether urolithiasis is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats.

DESIGN Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS 126 cats (59 and 67 with and without urolithiasis, respectively).

PROCEDURES Medical records from June 2006 to July 2013 were searched to identify cats that underwent abdominal or focal urinary tract ultrasonography and for which serum creatinine concentration and urine specific gravity data were obtained ≤ 14 days before or after the examination. In cats with (urolithiasis group) and without (control group) urolithiasis, the presence of CKD was determined according to International Renal Interest Society guidelines. Information recorded included signalment, body weight, serum creatinine concentration, and urine specific gravity; when present, the location and number of uroliths were noted. Differences between groups and associations between group and categorical variables were analyzed statistically.

RESULTS Age, weight, sex, and breed did not differ between groups. The prevalence of CKD was significantly higher in cats with urolithiasis than in the control group. Among cats with urolithiasis, there was a negative association between CKD and presence of cystoliths. There was no association between urolithiasis and the stage of CKD or between presence of CKD and location of nephroliths in the kidney.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results confirmed a positive association between urolithiasis and CKD in the feline population studied and suggested that cats with urolithiasis should be evaluated for CKD. Further research is warranted to assess the nature of the relationship between CKD and urolithiasis in cats.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify the prevalence of fragmentation of the proximal tubercle of the talus (FPTT) in a hospital population of horses, characterize the anatomic features of the affected area and fragments, and describe clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome for horses with FPTT.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 horses with FPTT.

Procedures—2,543 radiographic views of the tarsal region of 1,526 horses that were evaluated between June 2004 and December 2010 were reviewed. Medical case records for horses with detectable FPTT were retrieved, and signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic methods, treatment, and outcome were recorded for assessment.

Results—9 horses (median age, 5 years; age range, 1 to 12 years) with FPTT were identified. Seven horses were warmbloods. Diagnosis was made on the basis of radiographic findings, occasionally along with results of ultrasonography and CT. The only horse that was lame in the affected limb had a history of a prior traumatic event and resultant lateral tibial malleolus fracture. One horse underwent arthroscopy, but fragments were not found and were presumed to be extra-articular. Outcome was available for 7 horses; mean ± SD duration of stable radiographic and clinical examination findings was 3 ± 1 years (range, 1 to 4 years).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—FPTT appeared to occur more frequently in warmbloods and was not usually associated with lameness. Affected horses remained clinically and radiographically stable over time. These data have provided some information regarding the importance of FPTT for practitioners who perform radiographic screenings during prepurchase examinations.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the ability of signal attenuation–based quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (QMRI) to estimate subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) as assessed via quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in osteoarthritic joints of horses.

Sample Population—20 metacarpophalangeal joints from 10 horse cadavers.

Procedures—Magnetic resonance (MR) images (dorsal and transverse T1-weighted gradient recalled echo [GRE] and dorsal T2*-weighted GRE fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition [T2*-FIESTA]) and transverse single-slice computed tomographic (CT) images of the joints were acquired. Magnetic resonance signal intensity (SI) and CT attenuation were quantified in 6 regions of interest (ROIs) in the subchondral bone of third metacarpal condyles. Separate ROIs were established in the air close to the joint and used to generate corrected ratios and SIs. Computed tomographic attenuation was corrected by use of a calibration phantom to obtain a K2HPO4-equivalent density of bone. Correlations between QMRI performed with different MR imaging sequences and QCT measurements were evaluated. The intraobserver repeatability of ROI measurements was tested for each modality.

Results—Measurement repeatability was excellent for QCT (R 2 = 98.3%) and QMRI (R 2 = 98.8%). Transverse (R 2 = 77%) or dorsal (R 2 = 77%) T1-weighted GRE and QCT BMD measurements were negatively correlated, as were dorsal T2*-FIESTA and QCT (R 2 = 80%) measurements. Decreased bone SI during MR imaging linearly reflected increased BMD.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this ex vivo study suggested that signal attenuation–based QMRI was a reliable, clinically applicable method for indirect estimation of subchondral BMD in osteoarthritic metacarpophalangeal joints of horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 1-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was admitted for evaluation of a progressive gait disturbance characterized by tetraparesis and general proprioceptive ataxia in all limbs.

Clinical Findings—Neurologic examination suggested a dysfunction of the C6-T2 spinal cord segments, which was slightly worse on the right side. Discomfort was suspected upon lateral flexion of the neck. Two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at a 3-week interval revealed an intramedullary fluid-filled cavitary lesion adjacent to C7, containing a blood clot.

Treatment and Outcome—Following unsuccessful initial conservative management, surgical marsupialization of the lesion was performed through a dorsal laminectomy, durotomy, and myelotomy at C6 and C7. Histologic evaluation including immunohistochemistry was diagnostic for a vascular anomaly. Initially, the dog was nonambulatory with tetraparesis and became tetraplegic after surgery; movement was regained 6 days later. Four weeks after the procedure, the dog was able to walk unassisted. One year after surgery, the dog was actively running and jumping, with mild residual ataxia in the pelvic limbs.

Clinical Relevance—The intramedullary vascular anomaly in this dog was successfully treated with a surgical marsupialization technique. The combination of MRI, histologic eval-uation, and immunohistochemistry enabled lesion localization, evaluation of cavity content, and final diagnosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 18-month-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of left thoracic limb lameness.

Clinical Findings—A firm mass was palpable in the left scapular region. On the basis of clinical signs; results of radiographic, ultrasonographic, and cytologic evaluations; and findings on magnetic resonance imaging, an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the scapula was strongly suspected.

Treatment and Outcome—Considering the large size of the mass and the poor prognosis for return to function of the left thoracic limb, amputation was elected. Histologic evaluation ruled out a malignant process and was diagnostic for ABC originating from the left scapula. The patient recovered well and was ambulatory the day after surgery. Three years after surgery, the cat was healthy.

Clinical Relevance—The combination of radiography, regional ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging enabled lesion structure and cavity content evaluation. However, final diagnosis was confirmed by histologic evaluation. To our knowledge, this is the first veterinary report of the use of magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization and diagnosis of an ABC.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the variability in vertebral heart score (VHS) measurement induced by cardiac and respiratory cycles in dogs.

Design—Prospective observational study.

Animals—14 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs underwent fluoroscopic examination by 4 observers, and VHS was measured at end-tidal inspiration and end-tidal expiration during end systole and end diastole in left and right lateral recumbency. Mean VHS was compared within and among cardiac and respiratory phases and recumbency type, and correlation between VHS and heart rate was investigated. Interobserver variability was assessed.

Results—Mean VHS for each combination of respiratory and cardiac cycle was larger on images obtained in right lateral versus left lateral recumbency. The greatest differences were observed between VHS measured in the diastolic inspiratory phase (mean ± SD, 10.59 ± 0.49 vertebral units [VU] and 10.35 ± 0.50 VU for right and left lateral recumbency, respectively) and the systolic expiratory phase (10.11 ± 0.37 VU and 9.92 ± 0.50 VU for right and left lateral recumbency, respectively). The combination of respiratory and cardiac cycles induced a maximal difference in VHS of up to 0.97 VU and 1.11 VU in the inspiratory and expiratory phases, respectively. Heart rate was not correlated with the difference between VHS in systolic and diastolic phases.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clinicians should be aware of the potential influence of these factors when assessing VHS in dogs; in addition to allowing optimal pulmonary assessment, consistently taking radiographs at end-inspiratory tidal volume may help to limit VHS variability attributable to the respiratory cycle. Further research is needed to assess the effects of cardiac and respiratory phases on VHS in dogs with cardiac or respiratory disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of various radiographic signs in cats with feline bronchial disease (FBD) and evaluate intra- and interobserver variability in radiographic interpretation for examiners with variable degrees of experience in radiographic interpretation.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—40 cats with FBD and 40 control cats without thoracic disease.

Procedures—Radiographic abnormalities in cats with FBD were scored by consensus of 2 radiologists. Radiographs of control cats and cats with FBD were examined twice by 5 other individuals, and diagnostic accuracy and observer agreement were assessed.

Results—In cats with FBD, the most common radiographic signs were bronchial (n = 37) and unstructured interstitial (30) lung patterns, lung hyperinflation (31) and hyperlucency (21), aerophagia (19), and lung soft tissue opacities (11). Ratios of lung inflation on ventrodorsal views were significantly higher in cats with FBD. For the 5 examiners, sensitivity ranged from 71% to 89% and specificity ranged from 43% to 74%. Intraobserver agreement was good (N = 0.47 to 0.60), but the agreement between examiners was only poor to good (N = 0.22 to 0.70). For most examiners, significant associations were found between examiner diagnosis (correct vs incorrect), level of examiner certainty, and bronchial pattern severity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that several radiographic abnormalities can commonly be seen in cats with FBD but highlighted the limitations of thoracic radiography. Examiner diagnosis and level of confidence were significantly associated with severity of a bronchial pattern.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association