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  • Author or Editor: H. David Moll x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of unilaterally castrated horses among horses admitted to the hospital for castration and to compare horses that underwent previous unilateral castration with horses that had cryptorchism.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—16 unilaterally castrated horses and 44 cryptorchid horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses that were admitted to the veterinary medical teaching hospital for castration, including cryptorchid and unilaterally castrated horses, between January 2002 and December 2006 were reviewed. Medical records of unilaterally castrated horses and cryptorchid horses were examined for age, breed, history, diagnostic procedures, surgical technique of cryptorchidectomy, location of the retained testicle, and cost of surgery.

Results—Of 160 horses admitted for castration, 16 (10%) had undergone previous unilateral castration and 44 (27.5%) had cryptorchidism. Unilaterally castrated horses were significantly older than cryptorchid horses. No significant difference was found in left versus right distribution of testicles. No significant difference was found in abdominal versus inguinal distribution of left-sided testicles. Unilaterally castrated horses had a significantly lower proportion of right inguinal testicles, compared with cryptorchid horses. The cost of diagnosis and management of unilaterally castrated horses was significantly greater than in cryptorchid horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the distribution of retained testicles is significantly different in unilaterally castrated horses, compared with cryptorchid horses, which may affect the selection of diagnostic and surgical approaches to unilaterally castrated horses.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of the locking-loop suture pattern (LLP) and 3-loop pulley (3LP) suture pattern for tenorrhaphy on the intrinsic vasculature of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of horses in vitro after surgery.

Sample Population—16 forelimbs obtained from 8 mature horses.

Procedure—Tenotomy and subsequent tenorrhaphy was performed in anesthetized horses. Following systemic administration of heparin, horses were euthanatized and the limbs were removed and placed under tension to load the flexor tendons. The intrinsic vasculature was then perfused with a mixture of barium sulfate and water. Four-millimeter sections of the SDFT were prepared for microangiographic analysis. Mean vessel density was calculated for each section by use of a grid consisting of 1.5-mm2 vascular assessment squares (VAS). Comparisons were made among the control, LLP, and 3LP groups.

Results—Mean ± SD vessel density was 3.11 ± 0.38, 1.47 ± 0.47, and 2.01 ± 0.63 perfused vessels/1.5 mm2 for control, LLP, and 3LP groups, respectively. Significant differences in vascular density were detected between the control and 3LP groups, control and LLP groups, and LLP and 3LP groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of the LLP and 3LP pattern has deleterious effects in vitro on the intrinsic vasculature of the SDFT. However, the 3LP pattern was less disruptive to the intrinsic vasculature, compared with the effects for the LLP. Use of the 3LP tenorrhaphy suture pattern in clinical situations may result in less damage to the intrinsic vasculature of the SDFT of horses during convalescence. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:279–282)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate healing of pinch-grafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies bandaged with equine amnion or a standard nonadherent wound dressing material.

Animals—6 ponies.

Procedure—A 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness section of skin was removed from the dorsal aspect of each limb at the midpoint of the metacarpus or metatarsus. Six days later, wounds were grafted with partial-thickness pinch grafts. Half the wounds were bandaged with amnion, and the other half were bandaged with a nonadherent dressing. Bandages were changed every 3 days until wound healing was complete. At each bandage change, numbers of grafts lost were recorded, and wounds were measured.

Results—Percentage of grafts lost from wounds bandaged with amnion was not significantly different from percentage lost from wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing. Median healing time for wounds bandaged with amnion (30 days) was significantly less than median healing time for wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing (39 days). All wounds were healed by day 45.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that amnion can be used for bandaging pinchgrafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:326–329)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine lactate breakpoint of horses and test for effects of training and dietary supplementation with corn oil on that breakpoint.

Animals—7 healthy Arabian horses.

Procedures—Horses received a control diet (n = 4) or a diet supplemented with 10% corn oil (4). A training program, which comprised two 5-week conditioning periods with 1 week of rest, was initiated. Submaximal incremental exercise tests (IET) were conducted before the first and after both conditioning periods. Blood samples for determination of blood lactate and plasma glucose concentrations were collected 1 minute before IET and during the 15 seconds immediately preceding each speed change. Data collected were fit to one- and twoslope broken-line models and an exponential model.

Results—Good fits were obtained by application of the broken-line models (adjusted R 2 > 0.92) to blood lactate concentration versus speed curves. Lactate breakpoints increased 41% after training but were not affected by diet. After training, slope 2 and peak blood lactate concentrations were greater in the corn oil group, compared with controls. Mean blood lactate concentration at the breakpoint was not affected by training or diet. Plasma glucose concentration versus speed curves also fit the broken-line models, and glucose breakpoints preceded lactate breakpoints by approximately 1 m/s in the second and third IET.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lactate breakpoints can be determined for horses, using blood lactate concentration versus speed curves generated during submaximal IET and may be useful for assessing fitness and monitoring training programs in equine athletes. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:144–151)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research