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  • Author or Editor: Dominique Penninck x
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Abstract

Objective—To obtain ultrasonographic reference values for the thickness of the pancreas and the diameter of the pancreatic duct in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—242 adult dogs with no clinical signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

Procedures—The maximum pancreatic thickness and the diameter of the pancreatic duct were recorded ultrasonographically at the level of the left lobe, body, and right lobe of the pancreas.

Results—Mean ± SD pancreatic thickness measurements were as follows: left lobe, 6.5 ± 1.7 mm (n = 214); body, 6.3 ± 1.6 mm (155); and right lobe, 8.1 ± 1.8 mm (239). The mean pancreatic duct diameter was 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (n = 42) in the left lobe and 0.7 ± 0.2 mm (213) in the right lobe. The right pancreatic duct was visible in 213/242 (88.0%) dogs, and the left pancreatic duct was visible in 41/242 (16.9%) dogs. However, the body was visible in only 16/242 (6.6%) dogs. Pancreatic thickness and diameter of the pancreatic duct significantly increased with body weight in all lobes, but age was not correlated with the measurements.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ultrasonographic reference values for the pancreas and pancreatic duct of dogs were determined. Results of this study indicated that the pancreatic duct was visible, especially in the right lobe of the pancreas. These values may be useful for the assessment of pancreatic abnormalities, such as chronic pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the urinary bladder incision site in dogs that underwent cystotomy for treatment of urolithiasis.

DESIGN Prospective, longitudinal study.

ANIMALS 18 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs underwent urinary bladder ultrasonography at baseline (≤ 1 day before surgery) and at 1 day and approximately 2, 6, and 12 weeks after cystotomy for urocystolith removal. A baseline ratio between ventral (cystotomy site) and corresponding dorsal midline wall thickness was calculated and used to account for measurement variations attributable to bladder distension at subsequent visits. Patient signalment, weight, medications administered, urocystolith composition, and culture results were recorded. Clinical signs, reoccurrence of hyperechoic foci, and suture visualization were recorded at follow-up examinations. Variables were evaluated for association with cystotomy site thickening and resolution of thickening.

RESULTS Median wall thickness at the ventral aspect of the bladder was significantly greater than that of the corresponding dorsal aspect at baseline. Cystotomy site thickening peaked 1 day after surgery and decreased at subsequent visits in a linear manner. Twelve weeks after surgery, 5 of 10 clinically normal dogs evaluated had persistent cystotomy site thickening. Eleven of 18 dogs had reoccurrence of hyperechoic foci within the bladder at some time during the study (median time to first detection, 17 days after surgery).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Persistent cystotomy site thickening can be present up to 3 months after cystotomy for urolithiasis in dogs without lower urinary tract signs. Reoccurrence of hyperechoic foci in the bladder, although subclinical, was detected earlier and at a higher rate than anticipated.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To ultrasonographically measure the thickness of the individual wall layers of the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of dogs.

Animals—85 dogs with no clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of gastrointestinal tract disease.

Procedures—Total wall thickness and thickness of the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis, and serosa were measured ultrasonographically in the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of each dog.

Results—The mucosal layer was the thickest layer of the duodenum and jejunum. There was a significant difference in thickness of the mucosal layer between small and large dogs. Mean ± SD thickness of the mucosal layer of the duodenum for small, medium, and large dogs was 2.4 ± 0.5 mm, 2.6 ± 0.6 mm, and 2.8 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. Mean ± SD thickness of the mucosal layer of the jejunum for small, medium, and large dogs was 1.8 ± 0.4 mm, 2.0 ± 0.4 mm, and 2.2 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. The remaining wall layers of the duodenum and jejunum were similar in thickness, and there were no significant differences among small, medium, and large dogs. All layers contributed equally to the total colonic wall thickness. Mean ± SD thickness of the colonic wall for small, medium, and large dogs was 1.5 ± 0.3 mm, 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, and 1.6 ± 0.4 mm, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values for thickness of the wall layers of the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of dogs reported here may be useful for assessing gastrointestinal tract diseases primarily targeting a specific wall layer.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ultrasonography of the surgical sites of 15 dogs was performed 3 to 8 days after they underwent major orthopedic surgical procedures. Eight dogs were suspected of having incision-site complications on the basis of localized signs of pain, heat, or swelling and clinical signs of pyrexia, lethargy, or anorexia. Seven dogs had apparently normal healing of the incision. Ultrasonography was used to assess and compare the character of fluid accumulation, to detect fluid accumulation associated with evidence of distal enhancement, and to evaluate gas accumulation and disruption of muscle fibers. Ultrasonography of the 8 dogs with complications of the incision site revealed fluid accumulation (8 dogs), distal enhancement associated with fluid accumulations (2), disruption of muscle fibers (1), and gas accumulation (1). Ultrasonography of the 7 dogs with apparently normal healing of the incisions revealed fluid accumulations (2 dogs), fluid between fascial planes (4), disruption of muscle fibers (1), and gas accumulation (1). Aspirates of fluid were obtained from 7 dogs with suspected incision-site infection. Analysis of results of cytologic evaluation or bacterial culturing confirmed infection in 6 dogs and indicated that 1 dog had a sterile hematoma. Ultrasonography is a sensitive technique for the detection and localization of fluid accumulations; however, the detection of fluid accumulations was not limited to dogs with incision-site complications. Fluid accumulations can be evaluated by use of ultrasound-guided needle aspiration, which has few associated negative side-effects. During the early postoperative period, results for fluid evaluation of samples obtained by use of accurately placed aspiration needles can be used to serve as a guide for further treatment.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors associated with outcome in cats with extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction (EHBTO) that undergo biliary diversion surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—22 cats.

Procedures—Medical records of cats with surgically confirmed EHBTO that underwent cholecystoenterostomy were reviewed.

Results—Clinical signs and physical examination findings included vomiting, anorexia, icterus, lethargy, weakness, and weight loss. Common clinicopathologic abnormalities included high serum hepatic enzyme activities and serum bilirubin concentration. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed in 21 cats, and all 21 had findings consistent with EHBTO. Eleven of 15 cats in which blood pressure was monitored had intraoperative hypotension. Eighteen cats had anemia following surgery, and 14 cats had persistent hypotension. Extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction was a result of neoplasia in 9 cats and chronic inflammatory disease in 13. Fourteen cats survived long enough to be discharged from the hospital, but only 6 survived > 6 months after surgery, all of which had chronic inflammatory disease. Median survival time for cats with neoplasia (14 days) was significantly shorter than that for cats with inflammatory disease (255 days). No other variable was associated with outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats with EHBTO secondary to neoplasia have a poorer prognosis than cats with EHBTO secondary to chronic inflammatory disease. However, the overall prognosis for cats with EHBTO undergoing cholecystoenterostomy must be considered guarded to poor, and the incidence of perioperative complications is high.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of ileocecocolic junction (ICJ) resection on gastrointestinal signs, biochemical parameters, and nutritional variables in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

20 dogs and 15 cats that underwent ICJ resection between January 2008 and June 2020.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent ICJ resection were reviewed, and clinical signs, laboratory abnormalities, and nutritional information were obtained. Additional follow-up information was obtained by contacting primary care veterinarians or owners. A subset of dogs (n = 6) and cats (2) were evaluated in the hospital via clinical examination, clinicopathologic testing, nutritional testing, and abdominal ultrasound.

RESULTS

Twenty dogs and 15 cats underwent resection of the ICJ for treatment of a variety of conditions. Ten of 20 dogs (50%) and 11/15 cats (73%) were reported by their owners to have a good long-term outcome based on the lack of long-term gastrointestinal signs or the ability to control gastrointestinal signs with diet and supplements alone. Despite owner-reported good outcomes, long-term diarrhea, weight loss, and muscle loss were common. Of the 6 dogs evaluated in the hospital, 3/6 (50%) had muscle loss, 2/6 (33%) had low taurine concentrations, and 1 dog each had low cobalamin, folate, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and ionized calcium. Neither of the 2 cats evaluated in the hospital had nutritional abnormalities identified.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Owners should be informed of the possibility of long-term gastrointestinal clinical signs and the potential need for long-term nutritional management after ICJ resection.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term outcome of dogs with gallbladder mucocele.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—30 dogs with gallbladder mucocele, including 23 that underwent cholecystectomy.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, history, and clinical, ultrasonographic, and surgical findings. Follow-up information was obtained for all dogs that survived the perioperative hospitalization period.

Results—23 dogs had signs of systemic illness; 7 had no clinical signs. Median values for serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, serum total bilirubin concentration, and total WBC count were significantly higher among dogs with gallbladder rupture than among dogs without rupture. Sensitivity of sonography for detection of rupture was 85.7%. Overall perioperative mortality rate for dogs that underwent cholecystectomy was 21.7%; mortality rate was not significantly greater for dogs with rupture. Aerobic bacteria were isolated from the bile or gallbladder wall in 8.7% of dogs. All 18 dogs discharged from the hospital had complete resolution of clinical signs. In dogs that underwent in-hospital reexamination, serum liver enzyme activities were significantly decreased, compared with preoperative activities. Persistent increases in serum activities of 1 or more liver enzymes were detected in 9 of 12 dogs; 6 of 12 dogs had persistent abnormalities in hepatic echogenicity. Mean follow-up period was 13.9 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cholecystectomy is an effective treatment for gallbladder mucocele. Although perioperative mortality rate is high, prognosis after discharge from the hospital is excellent. Rupture of the gallbladder warrants emergency surgical intervention but does not preclude a positive outcome. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1615–1622)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate response to chemotherapy in cats with alimentary lymphoma and to determine factors associated with survival time.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

28 cats with alimentary lymphoma that underwent chemotherapy.

Results

In all cats, the diagnosis had been established by means of cytologic or histologic examination of ultrasound-guided aspirates and biopsy specimens (18 cats), histologic examination of surgically obtained biopsy specimens (7 cats), or examination of specimens obtained endoscopically (3 cats). Clinical signs included anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, and diarrhea. Twenty-seven cats were treated with vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; 1 was treated with chlorambucil and prednisone. Survival time ranged from 2 to 2,120 days (median, 50 days). Nine cats achieved complete remission (remission time ranged from 30 to 1,700 days; median, 213 days), 2 achieved partial remission, and 17 failed to respond to chemotherapy. Sex, FeLV status, hematocrit, serum total protein concentration, site and extent of gastrointestinal involvement, and clinical stage were not found to be associated with survival time.

Clinical Implications

Cats with alimentary lymphoma are poorly responsive to treatment with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; however, a small subset of cats may have long survival times.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association