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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of coadministration of naltrexone, a human opioid abuse deterrent, on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a methadone-fluconazole combination administered orally to dogs.

ANIMALS

12 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs (body weight, 10.7 to 13.9 kg) were randomly allocated to 2 groups in a parallel design study. All dogs received fluconazole (100 mg [7.19 to 9.35 mg/kg], PO). Twelve hours later (time 0), dogs were administered methadone (10 mg [0.72 to 0.93 mg/kg]) plus fluconazole (50 mg [3.62 to 4.22 mg/kg]; methadone-fluconazole) or methadone (10 mg [0.72 to 0.93 mg/kg]) plus fluconazole (50 mg [3.60 to 4.67 mg/kg]) and naltrexone (2.5 mg [0.18 to 0.23 mg/kg]; methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone), PO, in a gelatin capsule. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis, and rectal temperature and sedation were assessed to evaluate opioid effects at predetermined times up to 24 hours after treatment.

RESULTS

Most dogs had slight sedation during the 12 hours after drug administration; 1 dog/group had moderate sedation at 1 time point. Mean rectal temperatures decreased significantly from baseline (immediate pretreatment) values from 2 to ≥ 12 hours and 2 to ≥ 8 hours after methadone-fluconazole and methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone treatment, respectively. Geometric mean maximum observed concentration of methadone in plasma was 35.1 and 33.5 ng/mL and geometric mean terminal half-life was 7.92 and 7.09 hours after methadone-fluconazole and methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone treatment, respectively. Naltrexone was sporadically detected in 1 dog. The active naltrexone metabolite, β-naltrexol, was not detected. The inactive metabolite, naltrexone glucuronide, was detected in all dogs administered methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Opioid effects were detected after oral administration of methadone-fluconazole or methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone. Further studies assessing additional opioid effects, including antinociception, are needed.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure the effect of cold compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

Animals—10 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 (superficial), 1.0 (middle), and 1.5 (deep) cm into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Cold (–16.8°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no cold compress.

Results—Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of application at the superficial depth was significantly decreased, compared with control temperatures. Application for 10 and 20 minutes significantly reduced the temperature at all depths, compared with controls and 5 minutes of application. Twenty minutes of application significantly decreased temperature at only the middle depth, compared with 10 minutes of application.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—With this method of cold treatment, increasing application time from 10 to 20 minutes caused a further significant temperature change at only the middle tissue depth; however, for maximal cooling, the minimum time of application should be 20 minutes. Possible changes in tissue temperature and adverse effects of application > 20 minutes require further evaluation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure the effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

Animals—10 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 cm (superficial), 1.0 cm (middle), and 1.5 cm (deep) into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Warm (47°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no warm compress.

Results—Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of heat application at the superficial, middle, and deep depths was significantly increased, compared with the control temperature. Application for 10 minutes significantly increased the temperature at all depths, compared with 5 minutes of application. Mean temperature associated with 20 minutes of application was not different at the superficial or middle depths, compared with 10 minutes of application. Temperature at the deep depth associated with 10 minutes of application was significantly higher, compared with 20 minutes of application, but all temperature increases at this depth were minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that application of a warm compress should be performed for 10 minutes. Changes in temperature at a tissue depth of 1.5 cm were minimal or not detected. The optimal compress temperature to achieve therapeutic benefits was not determined.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the pharmacokinetics and opioid effects of methadone after administration of multiple doses by means of 2 dosing regimens of methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone.

ANIMALS

12 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly allocated (6 dogs/group) to receive 1 of 2 oral dosing regimens of methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone. Treatment 1 doses were administered at 0 (methadone-to-fluconazole-to-naltrexone ratio of 1:5:0.25 mg/kg), 14 (1:5:0.25), 24 (0.5:2.5:0.125), and 38 (0.5:2.5:0.125) hours. Treatment 2 doses were administered at 0 (1:5:0.25), 4 (0.5:2.5:0.125), 10 (0.5:2.5:0.125), and 24 (0.5:2.5:0.125) hours. Blood samples, rectal temperatures, and von Frey antinociceptive measurements were obtained at designated times.

RESULTS

Compared with baseline, temperatures significantly decreased for treatment 1 group dogs at 2 to ≥ 4 hours and from 16 to ≥ 50 hours (12 hours after last dose) and for treatment 2 group dogs at 2 to ≥ 36 hours (12 hours after last dose), when trough methadone concentrations were ≥ 21.3 ng/mL. Antinociception occurred after the first dose but was not maintained throughout the study. Lesions were noted in some dogs at the application site of the von Frey device. Naltrexone and β-naltrexol were sporadically detected in plasma, and naltrexone glucuronide was consistently detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Opioid effects were noted after oral administration of the first dose, and data suggested that administering a second dose 6 hours later and every 12 hours thereafter was necessary to maintain opioid effects. Antinociception may have been lost because dogs became averse or hyperalgesic to the von Frey device, such that the antinociception model used here may not be robust for repeated measurements in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate effects of strenuous exercise in adult horses immediately before anesthesia and to determine whether prior exercise affects anesthesia induction, recovery, or both.

Animals

6 healthy Thoroughbreds in good condition and trained to run on a treadmill, each horse serving as its own control.

Procedure

Horses ran on a treadmill until fatigued, then were sedated immediately with detomidine hydrochloride and anesthetized with a zolazepam hydrochloride-tiletamine combination. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen for another 90 minutes. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after exercise and during anesthesia.

Results

During exercise, changes in heart rate, core body temperature, plasma lactate concentration, arterial pH, and PaCO2 were significant. Plasma ionized calcium concentration was lower after exercise, compared with baseline values, and remained lower at 30 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia. Compared with baseline values, plasma chloride concentration decreased significantly during anesthesia after exercise. Cardiac output during anesthesia was significantly lower than that during preexercise, but significant differences between experimental and control periods were not observed. Arterial blood pressure during anesthesia was significantly lower than that during preexercise and initially was maintained better during isoflurane anesthesia after exercise. Cardiac output and blood pressure values were clinically acceptable throughout anesthesia.

Conclusion

Administration of detomidine hydrochloride followed by zolazepam hydrochloride-tiletamine appeared to be safe and effective for sedation and anesthesia of horses that had just completed strenuous exercise.

Clinical Relevance

Anesthetic given in accordance with this protocol can be used to anesthetize horses that are injured during athletic competition to assess injuries, facilitate first aid, and possibly allow salvage of injured horses. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:743–748)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine perioperative analgesia associated with oral administration of a novel methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy.

ANIMALS

43 healthy female dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to receive the methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at 1 of 2 dosages (0.5 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 0.125 mg/kg, respectively, or 1.0 mg/kg, 5.0 mg/kg, and 0.25 mg/kg, respectively, PO, q 12 h, starting the evening before surgery; n = 15 each) or methadone alone (0.5 mg/kg, SC, q 4 h starting the morning of surgery; 13). Dogs were sedated with acepromazine, and anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. A standard ovariohysterectomy was performed by experienced surgeons. Sedation and pain severity (determined with the Glasgow Composite Pain Scale—short form [GCPS-SF]) were scored for 48 hours after surgery. Rescue analgesia was to be provided if the GCPS-SF score was > 6. Dogs also received carprofen starting the day after surgery.

RESULTS

None of the dogs required rescue analgesia. The highest recorded GCPS-SF score was 4. A significant difference in GCPS-SF score among groups was identified at 6:30 am the day after surgery, but not at any other time. The most common adverse effect was perioperative vomiting, which occurred in 11 of the 43 dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Oral administration of a methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at either of 2 dosages every 12 hours (3 total doses) was as effective as SC administration of methadone alone every 4 hours (4 total doses) in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy. Incorporation of naltrexone in the novel formulation may provide a deterrent to human opioid abuse or misuse.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research