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  • Author or Editor: Anthony J. Fischetti x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 5-year-old female spayed mixed-breed dog was examined because of signs of persistent stranguria following treatment for urethral obstruction.

Clinical Findings—Radiographic, ultrasonographic, cystoscopic, and histologic findings were consistent with encrusted cystitis. Results of bacteriologic culture of urine and bladder wall biopsy samples indicated growth of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog was initially treated via IV administration of fluids, placement of an indwelling urinary catheter, lavage of the bladder with sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and administration of antimicrobial drugs and bethanechol (to improve voiding of urine from the bladder). Antimicrobial drugs were administered for 3 months, and a commercially available diet for dissolution of urinary calculi was fed. Clinical signs of encrusted cystitis gradually resolved during the 3 months after the initial examination. Results of urinalysis and abdominal ultrasonographic examination performed 4 months after the initial examination indicated resolution of the disease.

Clinical Relevance—Encrusted cystitis is extremely rare in small animals and has previously only been associated with Corynebacterium spp infection of the urinary bladder. Resolution of encrusted cystitis has previously been achieved via surgical debridement of the bladder and treatment with antimicrobial drugs. The clinical findings and successful resolution of clinical signs in the dog of the present report suggested that urease-positive bacteria other than Corynebacterium spp can cause encrusted cystitis and that feeding of a diet for dissolution of urinary calculi in conjunction with antimicrobial treatment may result in resolution of urinary bladder lesions and clinical signs attributable to the disease without the need for surgical debridement of encrusted plaques.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate complications and outcomes associated with surgical placement of gastrojejunostomy feeding tubes in dogs with naturally occurring disease.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—26 dogs.

Procedures—Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were evaluated. Daily postoperative abdominal radiographic examinations were performed to determine the presence of the following mechanical tube complications: kinking, coiling, knotting, and migration. Tube stoma abnormalities (erythema, cellulitis, and discharge) were observed daily and recorded by use of a standardized visual analog grading scale. Additionally, presence of complications was compared with median survival times.

Results—The most common indication for gastrojejunostomy tube placement was gastrointestinal disease (n = 11), with confirmed septic peritonitis in 8 of 11 dogs. Other indications for gastrojejunostomy tube placement included extrahepatic biliary surgery (n = 6) and pancreatic disease (9). Mean ± SD surgical time required for tube placement was 26 ± 14 minutes. Overall, mechanical tube complication rate was 46% (12/26), including coiling (7), migration (4), and kinking (2). Overall minor tube stoma complication rate was 77% (20/26) and included erythema (16), cellulitis (13), and discharge (17). Dislodgement or self-induced tube trauma resulted in accidental tube removal in 2 of 26 dogs, and inadvertent tube damage necessitated premature removal by the clinician in 1 of 26 dogs. Kaplan-Meier median survival time was 39 days with 13 of 26 dogs still alive.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Gastrojejunostomy tube placement affords flexibility in the postoperative nutritional regimen by allowing for postgastric feeding with simultaneous access to the stomach.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the accuracy of 4 preoperative parameters (signalment, urinalysis, urine microbiological culture, and digital radiography) in predicting urocystolith composition, compare accuracy between evaluators of varying clinical experience and a mobile application, and propose a novel algorithm to improve accuracy.

ANIMALS

175 client-owned dogs with quantitative analyses of urocystoliths between January 1, 2012, and July 31, 2020.

METHODS

Prospective experimental study. Canine urocystolith cases were randomly presented to 6 blinded “stone evaluators” (rotating interns, radiologists, internists) in 3 rounds, each separated by 2 weeks: case data alone, case data with a urolith teaching lecture, and case data with a novel algorithm. Case data were also entered into the Minnesota Urolith Center mobile application. Prediction accuracy was determined by comparison to quantitative laboratory stone analysis results.

RESULTS

Prediction accuracy of evaluators varied with experience when shown case data alone (accuracy, 57% to 82%) but improved with a teaching lecture (accuracy, 76% to 89%) and further improved with a novel algorithm (accuracy, 93% to 96%). Mixed stone compositions were the most incorrectly predicted type. Mobile application accuracy was 74%.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of the 4 preoperative parameters resulted in variable accuracy of urocystolith composition predictions among evaluators. The proposed novel algorithm improves accuracy for all clinicians, surpassing accuracy of the mobile application, and may help guide patient management.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association