Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ana Nemec x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors Ana Nemec and Boaz Arzi
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 8-year-old 23.5-kg (51.7-lb) spayed female Siberian Husky was evaluated because of a firm, 15-mm, right suborbital swelling that had not changed in size or appearance since it had first been noticed 7 weeks earlier. At the time of initial examination by the referring veterinarian, signs of pain were evident during manipulation of the mass, along with severe focal gingivitis and gingival recession at the right maxillary fourth premolar tooth. The dog was treated with meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], SC, once), cefazolin (20 mg/kg [9.1 mg/lb], SC, once), and enrofloxacin (3.7 mg/kg [1.7 mg/lb],

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 7-year-old 8.6-kg (18.9-lb) castrated male Pug was evaluated because of chronic nasal discharge. Respiratory signs, which started 3 weeks following ingestion of coffee beans, had been noticed for the past 2.5 years and had developed into respiratory distress. Six months after the onset of clinical signs, the patient developed a mucoid discharge from the left nostril. Rhinoscopy revealed hyperemia and mucus in the left nasal cavity. The mucoid discharge resolved temporarily with the use of amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (14.5 mg/kg [6.59 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h), but occasional treatment with neomycin–polymyxin B–dexamethasone ophthalmic drops (in

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence and types of tooth resorption in dogs with oral tumors and to compare findings with those for control dogs.

Animals—101 dogs with oral tumors and 128 control dogs that did not have oral tumors and for which dental radiographs were available.

Procedures—Exclusion criteria for dogs included systemic disease, long-term administration of anti-inflammatory drugs, traumatic occlusion, severe semigeneralized or generalized periodontitis, and endodontic disease. For each dog with an oral tumor, histologic sections of biopsy specimens of tumors were examined. Dental radiographic images of dogs were examined, and the presence and type of tooth resorption were determined for each tooth. Statistical analyses were performed to compare data regarding prevalence of tooth resorption.

Results—Teeth at tumor sites in dogs with nonodontogenic tumors were significantly more frequently affected with external inflammatory resorption, compared with teeth at tumor sites in dogs with odontogenic tumors. Teeth at sites distant from tumors in dogs with oral tumors were 3.2 times as likely to have external surface resorption (OR, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 7.9) and 83.4 times as likely to have external inflammatory resorption (OR, 83.4; 95% confidence interval, 9.7 to 719.6) as teeth in control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Resorption of teeth at tumor sites and at sites distant from tumors was common in dogs with oral tumors. Results of the present study will contribute to an understanding of the complex effects of oral tumors on local and distant hard tissues.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify risk factors associated with survival in dogs with nontonsillar oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) that were and were not treated with curative-intent surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with OSCC.

Procedures—Medical records for dogs with OSCC that were not treated, or were treated with curative-intent surgery only between January 1990 and December 2010 were reviewed. For each dog, data regarding signalment, clinical stage, treatment, tumor recurrence, and survival time were obtained from the medical record, and archived biopsy specimens were evaluated to identify the histologic subtype of the tumor and extent of tumor-associated inflammation (TAI), perineural invasion (PNI), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI).

Results—Risk of death for the 21 dogs with OSCC that were surgically treated was decreased 91.4% (hazard ratio, 0.086; 95% confidence interval, 0.002 to 0.150), compared with that for the 10 dogs with OSCC that were not treated. The 1-year survival rate was 93.5% and 0% for dogs that were and were not surgically treated, respectively. Risk of death increased significantly with increasing TAI and increasing risk score (combination of TAI, PNI, and LVI). Tumor location, clinical stage, and histologic subtype were not associated with survival time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the prognosis for dogs with OSCC was excellent following surgical excision of the tumor. Risk of death increased with increasing TAI, and combining TAI, PNI, and LVI into a single risk score may be a useful prognostic indicator for dogs with OSCC.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association