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Fluid therapy remains an essential treatment for ill reptiles, although best practices for fluid administration have not been established and controversy remains regarding the most appropriate electrolyte solution for dehydrated reptiles. 1

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Dehydration is a common problem in reptiles presented for veterinary care. Fluid therapy is routinely used to replace fluid deficits in reptile patients, and the administration route can vary depending on several factors such as

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

for use in reptiles. 1–3 Therefore, application and interpretation of invasive and noninvasive monitoring techniques is in its infancy, which makes diagnosis of cardiopulmonary disease and monitoring of anesthesia challenging. Determination of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

nutritional disorders such as calcium deficiencies and subsequent metabolic bone diseases are rare in wild chelonians. Although a considerable amount of evidence-based information has been obtained on reptile physiology-biology 9–11 and management, 12

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of vitamin D 3 have involved mammals and birds. 9 Historically, studies 4,8,10,11 performed in reptiles have focused on dietary and basking requirements in various lizard species. Recently, an investigation 12 of the effects of UVB radiation in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,8,10,11 that have been performed in reptiles have focused on dietary requirements and synthesis during basking in various lizards. The authors are not aware of any studies to determine whether chelonians synthesize vitamin D 3 during basking or obtain vitamin

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

and liver. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the heart is an important diagnostic tool in many species. 4,9–11 In reptiles, echocardiographic information is comparably small and limited to physiologic and anatomic descriptions. 12–14 Nevertheless, a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

radiation has been shown to increase plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in reptiles, 10–13 we were interested to determine whether such treatment could have a similar effect on captive indoor rabbits. The biological hypothesis tested was that captive

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research