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abscesses) in rabbits can lead to the development of severe osteomyelitis, with subsequent anorexia and eventual animal death. The etiology of odontogenic abscesses is complex; however, the most common cause is periapical bacterial infection of a diseased or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

’s comfort improved initially; however, 3 days later she became non–weight-bearing. Repeat radiographic examination of the tarsus was performed, revealing marked progression of the TMT osteomyelitis, and the horse was humanely euthanized (pentobarbital, 85 mg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Clinically and radiographically aggressive bone lesions are most commonly caused by osteosarcoma (OSA) in dogs; however, osteomyelitis is an important differential diagnosis and may be fungal or bacterial in nature. 1 , 2 In

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of foals with septic arthritis indicated that 88% (30/34) of foals for which serum IgG concentrations were available had partial or complete failure of passive transfer. Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis are often sequels to septicemia in foals. 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

osteomyelitis, were also observed. A CBC revealed leukocytosis (13.80 × 10 3 leukocytes/L; reference range, 3.4 × 10 3 leukocytes/L to 12.6 × 10 3 leukocytes/L), b characterized by presumed (on the basis of mammalian data) marked monocytosis (8.42 × 10 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tissues, has been reported in bone lesions in 4 horses. 2 Several cases of septic arthritis in horses have reportedly been caused by fungal infections. 3–5 In horses, the cause of osteomyelitis of the axial borders of the proximal sesamoid bones is not

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A49-year-old (estimated age) female Aldabra tortoise ( Geochelone gigantea ) was evaluated because of focal necrosis, deep abscess formation, and osteomyelitis affecting the third vertebral carapacial scute and underlying dermal bone. Manual

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the suspected osteomyelitis lesion in the dog, so the surgical plan was created to extract the affected teeth, remove sequestrum, and obtain adequate samples for biopsy and cultures. In brief, a mucoperiosteal flap was elevated to facilitate surgical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

routinely in 3 layers. The patient recovered without apparent complications. Figure 4— Intraoperative photographs of the rabbit in Figure 1 during hemilaminectomy for treatment of a paraspinal abscess with osteomyelitis and spinal cord compression

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

( Figure 2 ) . Considering the patient age, breed and multifocal clinical presentation, the primary differential diagnosis was infectious osteomyelitis (fungal Aspergillus spp were considered most likely due to the patient signalment) with suspicion of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association