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extract administered PO in dogs. Cardiac glycosides are a class of natural compounds found in various plants, with digitalis (from Digitalis purpurea , which is commonly referred to as foxglove) and oleandrin from N oleander being notable examples

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

California, Davis, from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2006, were searched to identify those relating to New World camelids that were treated for oleander intoxication. A camelid was included in the study if oleandrin, the primary cardiac glycoside of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

humans and other animals, oleander has toxic effects that are attributable to cardenolides, including the cardiac glycosides oleandrin and nerine. The toxic effects of these agents are cumulative, and all parts (fresh or dried) of the plant are toxic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A highly sensitive and selective multiple reaction monitoring method was set for detection of oleandrin. An enhanced product ion experiment was performed, and the extracted multiple reaction monitoring

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

provisional diagnosis of oleander poisoning was made. The concentration of digoxinlike substances (oleandrin) in a serum sample was measured with a commercial digoxin assay a because oleandrin is known to cross-react with the anti-digoxin antibody, and the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

described in many species, but little information is available on the clinical course or appropriate treatment of oleander toxicosis in New World camelids. A review of medical records of 11 llamas and 1 alpaca with detectable amounts of oleandrin in serum

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

found, especially when azotemia or cardiac arrhythmias are detected concurrently, according to results of a review of medical records. The study involved 30 equids with detectable concentrations of oleandrin in serum, plasma, urine, or gastrointestinal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

oleandrin and other steroidal glycosidic cardenolides (types of cardiac glycosides [CGs]) that are present in the leaves, fruits, flowers, stems, and roots of N oleander . Any portion of the plant has a sufficient concentration of CGs to cause clinical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

affect the digestive system of equids and cause enterocolitis, typhlitis, or both. 8 In addition, toxicoses from toxins (eg, oleandrin [the toxic principle of Nerium oleander ] 4,9 ) or drugs (eg, NSAIDs 8 ) can affect the digestive tract and result in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association