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Oleander is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae. There are 2 genera of oleander— Nerium and Thevetia spp. The former has only 1 polymorphic species, called Nerium oleander (> 400 pink, white, purple, and yellow

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Nerium oleander is a well-known botanical species that has been employed for centuries in traditional medicine due to the well-recognized therapeutic properties of constituent molecules known as cardiac glycosides. This flowering

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Oleander, a flowering evergreen shrub of the Apocynaceae (ie, dogbane) family, is commonly found in the southern and western United States, South America, and regions of Europe, Africa, and Asia. Yellow oleander ( Thevetia peruviana ) is commonly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Pairs of budgerigars were given samples, by gavage, of plants considered potentially toxic to pet birds. Samples were prepared by flash-freezing and powdering fresh plant material in liquid nitrogen and resuspending the material in deionized water for administration. Of the 19 plants tested, only 6 induced clinical signs of illness; these plants included yew, oleander, clematis, avocado, black locust, and Virginia creeper (Taxus media, Nerium oleander, Clematis sp, Persea americana, Robinia pseudoacacia, Parthenocissus quinquefolio).

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate biocompatibility and effects of implantation of 3-dimensional chondrocyte-agarose autografts in tibial defects in rabbits and to compare in vitro and in vivo chondrocyte-agarose constructs with respect to cell viability, differentiation, and matrix production.

Animals—24 adult New Zealand White rabbits.

Procedure—Three-dimensional constructs with (grafted group) or without (control group) autogenous chondrocytes were implanted into tibial defects of rabbits and cultured in vitro. During an 8-week period, defects were evaluated radiographically, grossly, histologically, biochemically, and immunohistochemically. In vitro constructs were evaluated histologically, biochemically, and immunohistochemically.

Results—Tibial defects had significantly higher radiographic densitometry values at 4 and 6 weeks after implantation in grafted group rabbits, compared with control group rabbits. Number of observed centers of endochondral ossification was significantly greater in defects of grafted group rabbits, compared with control group rabbits. On day 14, glycosaminoglycan concentration was significantly higher in tibial defects of grafted group rabbits, compared to defects of control group rabbits or in vitro constructs. At weeks 2, 4, and 8, glycosaminoglycan concentrations were significantly lower in the in vitro control constructs, compared with other groups. Collagen type I was present in bone and bony callous in defects of grafted and control group rabbits. Collagen type II was identified in cartilaginous tissues of grafted and control group rabbits. Collagen type X was associated with hypertrophic chondrocytes. Only type II collagen was found in the in vitro chondrocyte constructs.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Chondrocyte-agarose grafts are biocompatible in large tibial defects and appear to provide a cell source for augmenting endochondral ossification. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:12–20)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Leaves or fruit from 14 plants considered to be toxic to pet birds were administered by gavage to 15 pairs of canaries (Serinus canaria). Each bird was given 0.12 to 0.70 g of plant material. One pair served as a control and was given distilled water. The plant materials were flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen, pulverized, and resuspended in deionized water for administration. Of the plants tested, 5 (oleander, lupine, foxglove, yew leaves, and dieffenbachia) were considered highly toxic and were associated with acute death of birds. The remaining plant samples caused no, or only transient, clinical illness.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that was not connected to a power supply. The next day, the dog ate a lot of grass and vomited. Therefore, the owners isolated the dog in a vegetated area; that area contained several oleander plants ( Nerium oleander ). Subsequently, the dog vomited

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

corresponding plant material. The leaves were compatible with oleander ( Nerium oleander ). Withdrawal of the hay lot and treatment of the remaining animals with atropine sulfate (0.06 mg/kg, SC, q 8 h until arrhythmia resolved or for a maximum of 3 days

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A 12-year-old 13.2-kg (29.0-lb) spayed female crossbreed dog was referred to a veterinary hospital after the ingestion of Nerium oleander leaves. The owner reported multiple episodes of vomiting, sialorrhea, and lethargy. On

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

concentrations detected in pigs in phase 2 of the study. See PAGE 299 Oleander intoxication in New World camelids Oleander is an evergreen shrub or small tree that is highly toxic to most mammalian species. The toxic effects of oleander have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association