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circumduction that was worse for the left pelvic limb. The remainder of the gait analysis was truncated because of grade 4/5 lameness of the right thoracic limb. Cardiac auscultation before and after the lameness evaluation did not reveal changes in the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 14-month-old 1.31-kg (2.88-lb) spayed female Toy Poodle was evaluated on an emergency basis because of sudden-onset non–weight-bearing lameness of the left forelimb. Radiography of the limb revealed complete, transverse distal diaphyseal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

suggestive of lameness as a result of historic trauma. The owners of the cat elected for conservative workup of the problem, and supportive pain management was instituted with administration of buprenorphine hydrochloride. Nine days later, the cat was taken

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

healthy until non–weight-bearing lameness of the left thoracic limb was noticed by the owner. Although unwitnessed, it was thought that the dog's lameness was the result of being kicked by a horse. Prior to the referral evaluation, the referring

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

osteotomy plate was removed because of lameness and suspected infection. Electrocardiographic abnormalities were not detected during any of the dog's previous anesthetic episodes. The dog had no other pertinent medical history. Initial physical examination

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) were initiated. Fluid therapy was discontinued. By day 7, the signs of laminitis had resolved and the horse had no residual lameness. On day 9, ECG findings indicated that the horse had converted to sinus rhythm (48 to 60 beats/min). By day 10, all

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dog was alert, responsive, and ambulatory other than mild left hind limb lameness. Cardiac auscultation revealed a left-sided grade 3/6 systolic cardiac murmur. A complete cardiac workup had been performed 1 week prior to admission, and at that time

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and gag reflex. Mild right pelvic limb lameness was also observed. Hematologic and venous blood gas and electrolyte analyses were performed, and results were unre-markable. Serum biochemical analysis revealed high creatine kinase activity (2,334 U

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sounds during rebreathing examination. Rectal temperature was 38.1 °C. Gastrointestinal sounds and digital pulses were considered normal. In horses without any obvious lameness, exercise intolerance is most often secondary to a cardiac, respiratory, or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

rate was 190 beats/min, and the rhythm was irregular. Severe left forelimb lameness was evident. Echocardiography revealed marked dilation and hypertrophy of the right ventricle. Severely thickened tricuspid valve leaflets were present, resulting in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association