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The prevalence of hypocobalaminemia in dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease ranges from 6% to 19%. 1,2 Cobalamin deficiency may develop during chronic and severe small intestinal disease as a result of damage of mucosal receptors for the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Aunique syndrome of severe eosinophilic dermatitis with edema has been described in dogs with and without concurrent signs of gastrointestinal disease, particularly vomiting and hematochezia. 1–3 Skin lesions in those dogs include deeply

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

VDBP, to develop an equine VDBP assay and establish a set of working reference values in healthy horses for its use, and to evaluate VDBP concentrations in horses with acute gastrointestinal diseases. We hypothesized that circulating VDBP concentrations

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-lightguide spectrophotometry system would be easy to use to quickly and reliably assess microcirculation in the intestinal tract of horses without gastrointestinal disease. Materials and Methods Horses —Thirteen horses were included in the study. Age ranged from 3 to 27

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Initiation of SIRS as a result of the transmural movement of LPS from the intestinal lumen into circulation is a fairly common occurrence in horses with severe forms of gastrointestinal disease (ie, those with the highest morbidity and mortality

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

disorders can cause considerable renal hypoperfusion and subsequent azotemia. 2,3 Additionally, many horses with gastrointestinal disease are treated by their owners and referring veterinarians with potentially nephrotoxic medications, such as nonsteroidal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

synergistic effects of prebiotics and other dietary fibers on dog and cat health are lacking, and further research is warranted. Fiber and Management of Clinical Gastrointestinal Disease Acute diarrhea There is evidence supporting the management of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Packed cell volume, total plasma protein, serum sodium, potassium, and ionized Ca2+ concentrations, and blood pH were determined at the time of admission and following surgery in 147 horses with acute abdominal crisis. Horses were allotted to 3 categories on the basis of the surgical lesion: (1) nonstrangulating obstruction of the ascending or descending colon (category A, n = 76), (2) strangulating and nonstrangulating infarction of the cecum or ascending colon (category B, n = 37), and (3) strangulating and nonstrangulating infarction of the small intestine (category C, n = 25). Horses with low serum ionized Ca2+ concentration following surgery were given 23% calcium gluconate (100 to 300 ml) IV to effect, and ionized Ca2+ concentration was determined following treatment.

The serum ionized Ca2+ concentrations of horses in categories A, B, and C before and after surgery were lower than our normal laboratory reference range. Prior to surgery, serum ionized Ca2+ concentration measured from horses in category B and C was lower than that in horses in category A. There was no difference in ionized Ca2+ concentration in serum samples obtained before surgery in horses from category B and C, and in serum samples obtained following surgery. There was a decrease in ionized Ca2+ concentration during surgery in horses in category A. There was no change between preoperative and postoperative ionized Ca2+ concentration in the samples obtained from horses in category B and C. After calcium gluconate administration, all horses with low serum ionized Ca2+ after surgery had concentrations within our normal range.

Measurement of serum ionized Ca2+ in horses with an acute abdominal crisis is recommended. If concentrations are low, calcium gluconate diluted in fluids and administered iv to effect appears to provide an effective method of treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association