Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,019 items for :

  • "environment" x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All

emergence and mitigation of AMR. 9 , 10 While these are all important, we are growing increasingly aware of the impact the environment has on the emergence, amplification, dissemination, and persistence of ARB and genes that affect our veterinary patients

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-resistant gene type in South Pacific and Asian countries. 4 This leads to important scientific questions about where this antimicrobial resistance gene (ARG) originated and how it was introduced and amplified in the environment of a pig farm in the US. Similar

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

parasympathetic tone and inhibit motility and secretion of the gastrointestinal tract. 8 Dogs confined in cages in a hospital environment have significantly different gastric emptying times, compared with dogs in their normal home environment. 9 – 11 These

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-mediated conditions, including the early stages of osteoarthritis. Contemporary evidence indicates that the regenerative effects of MSCs are the result of their secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which alter the recipient environment and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

’ knowledge, the reliability of comparison between axillary and rectal temperatures has not been assessed in veterinary patients in a controlled environment. Authors of a recent veterinary report 10 describe comparison of axillary and rectal temperatures in

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

24.8  Female 185 75.2  Nonbinary/third gender 0 0.0  Prefer to self-describe 0 0.0 Factors underpinning career-related decision-making were ranked by level of importance as (1) workplace environment/culture ( x

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To survey faculty and house officers of clinical departments of colleges of veterinary medicine (CVM) to identify characteristics of sexual harassment (SH) in the veterinary academic environment, to report the opinions of survey respondents on how SH is being handled, and to determine how the process can be improved at veterinary academic institutions.

Procedure—On the basis of lists obtained from 25 CVM, a survey was mailed to 1,294 academic veterinarians. Four hundred seventy-eight completed surveys were returned.

Results—The prevalence of SH in the population of respondents was 31%. Nonphysical forms of SH were reported 6 times as often as physical forms of harassment, with the most common type reported being offensive sexual comments and unwanted attention. Fear of reprisal was the most prevalent reason cited by respondents for not confronting the harasser. Survey respondents rated the following as very important to improve the system of dealing with SH at their academic institution: guarantee of protection from retaliation, assurance of confidentiality, clear explanation of what will happen to you, and a clearer definition of SH.

Conclusion—A clear definition of SH is the first step in preventing SH. Other cited steps include professional development programs to educate the academic population as to what constitutes SH, inform the entire academic population what the institution's SH policy is, and enforce this policy with sensitivity, fairness, confidentiality, and quick resolve to protect the victim. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1406–1409)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) to identify factors associated with elevated burden-transfer risk by examining the association between levels of burden transfer and (a) aspects of the psychosocial work environment pertaining to well-being and (b) individual burnout as a metric of

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Cats housed in shelters commonly experience unmitigated fear, anxiety, and stress. 1 , 2 Minimizing negative affective states is critical to cat health and welfare in the shelter environment. 3 This is especially important in

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

To determine the effects of heat stress and drinking water treatments on physical characteristics of skeletal tissue, tibias of cockerels ranging in age from 4 to 11 weeks were tested for breaking strength. Birds were subjected to either a thermoneutral environment (21 ± 2 C) or a hot environment (37 ± 2 C) and supplied with either tap or carbonated drinking water. Breaking strength of tibias was reduced in the hot environment; however, consumption of carbonated drinking water in the hot environment resulted in bone strength comparable with that associated with thermoneutral environment (both types of water). Also, bones from birds of the carbonated water- 37 C treatment group had less phase breaks and tended to separate with a single break. Results indicate that hot environment and carbonated drinking water not only affect the previously reported morphologic and chemical characteristics of developing bone, but also their physical attributes.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research