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Introduction Calves are born agammaglobulinemic and rely on colostrum ingestion to absorb essential immunoglobulins for defense against disease. 1 Adequate transfer of passive immunity (ATPI) through colostrum is dependent on; 1) whether the

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, or not fed colostrum until ≥ 4 hours after birth. 7 It is estimated that pooled MC is fed to calves on 21% of US dairies. 7 Feeding colostrum pooled from multiple cows is a risk factor for FPT as well as the transmission of many colostrum

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Neonatal calves must ingest colostrum during the first day after birth to acquire passive immunity via the active uptake of maternal IgG across the intestinal epithelium. 1 Suboptimal transfer of passive immunity in dairy calves results in an

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The importance of the ingestion and absorption of colostral immunoglobulins on morbidity, fatalities, growth, and future productivity of dairy calves has been described. 1–6 Calves with inadequate passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Consumption of an adequate quantity of good-quality colostrum within the first 24-hour period after birth is important for the health and future productivity of dairy calves. 1–3 When the formation, ingestion, or absorption of colostral

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The importance of passive transfer of colostral immunity on morbidity, mortality rate, and production has been well documented in calves. 1–6 Currently, the prevalence of FPI in dairy heifer calves in the United States is reported as 19.2%. 7

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

priming by the cow must occur via ingestion of colostrum. Failure to transfer colostral components from the cow to the calf within a few hours of birth has important negative consequences on the health and development of the calf. 1 Furthermore

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Because adequate passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins is so important to calf survival and health, numerous methods for assessing IgG concentration in bovine colostrum have been developed. Currently, the most accurate method of measuring

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Proper colostrum management is well recognized as a vital step in preventing disease in neonatal calves, but failure of passive transfer of immunity continues to be a common problem in the US dairy industry. 1,2 Transfer of passive immunity is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of colostrum is crucial for newborn pigs to acquire passive immunity from sows. Porcine colostrum contains soluble components (eg, immunoglobulins and cytokines) as well as mononuclear cells such as B cells (CD21+), monocytes or macrophages (CD14

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research