Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 134 items for :

  • "arthrocentesis" x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All

Introduction Arthrocentesis remains a common procedure performed by equine veterinarians and the ability to perform arthrocentesis is expected of veterinary graduates entering equine practice. 1 , 2 A stakeholder survey regarding new

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to the other, 8 and this may influence the therapeutic effect of medication administered intra-articularly. Consequently, selective arthrocentesis of both the TMT and centrodistal joints for intra-articular analgesia and treatment of distal tarsal

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
Author:

In horses, arthrocentesis of the distal interphalangeal joint is commonly performed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Although various techniques for arthrocentesis of this joint have been described, 1–11 the importance of choosing a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

effect of this product on responses to subsequent MC and MCP joint arthrocentesis and jugular vein catheterization. Our hypothesis was that the vapocoolant spray treatment would significantly reduce horses' responses to these procedures, compared with

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

characteristics of joint fluid obtained via arthrocentesis. Arthrocentesis performed through cellulitic tissue is perceived to be risky in that needles advanced through infected tissue (skin and subepidermal layers) may deposit bacteria into an otherwise normal

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Synovial extramedullary hematopoiesis is a rarely reported condition in humans and, to date, has never been reported in canines. This case report describes the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, treatment, and outcome of a canine case confirmed to have hematopoietic tissue within multiple joints.

ANIMAL

A client-owned canine.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION, PROGRESSION, AND PROCEDURES

The clinical presentation was most consistent with immune-mediated polyarthritis, and arthrocentesis was performed in multiple joints for cytological evaluation and culture. Cytology revealed evidence of extramedullary hematopoiesis, and shortly thereafter the dog was diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Pregabalin, prednisolone, clopidogrel, and cyclosporine were started, and after several recheck appointments and dose adjustments, the dog’s clinical signs resolved for all conditions.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Unusual sites of extramedullary hematopoietic tissue may result in a clinical presentation for which more traditional etiologies and differentials are not applicable.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a method for arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint in adult horses.

Animals—7 equine cadaver heads and 6 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedure—Fluoroscopy, contrast radiography, and computed tomography were used on cadaver specimens to locate the temporomandibular joint, identify externally palpable landmarks for joint access, guide needle placement into the joint, and illustrate regional anatomy. The arthrocentesis technique was performed on 6 live healthy adult horses to determine efficacy and safety of this procedure.

Results—Externally palpable structures were identified as landmarks for temporomandibular arthrocentesis, including the lateral border of the condylar process of the mandible, the zygomatic process of the temporal bone, and the lateral pericapsular fat pad. Arthrocentesis was successful in all 6 joints in the live horses, and no complications developed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The technique identified will improve the ability to examine and treat the temporomandibular joint in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:729–735).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine anatomic landmarks for a lateral approach for arthrocentesis of the proximopalmarolateral aspect of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint in horses and the likelihood of entering synovial structures other than the DIP joint through this approach.

Design

Prospective study.

Sample Population

Paired forelimbs of 8 cadavers and 12 horses.

Procedure

Anatomic preparations were used to determine anatomic landmarks. Positive-contrast arthrography was used to determine which structures were entered.

Results

Landmarks for the lateral approach included a depression in the proximal border of the lateral ungular cartilage and the palmar border of the middle phalanx. Use of the lateral approach for arthrography resulted in deposition of contrast material exclusively in the DIP joint in only 13 of 20 limbs, whereas use of the dorsal approach resulted in deposition of contrast material exclusively in the DIP joint in 20 of 20 limbs.

Clinical Implications

The lateral approach is an alternative to the conventional dorsal approach to the DIP joint in horses; however, inadvertent entry into adjacent synovial structures is a possible complication. The lateral approach provides an additional portal for through-and-through lavage and arthroscopic access to the palmar aspect of the DIP joint. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212:1413–1418)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

horses with naturally occurring joint disease and assess the effect of repeated arthrocentesis on synovial fluid SAA concentrations, with the overall purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of this marker in horses with joint disease. Materials

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Septic arthritis is a major problem in horses and cattle, 1–4 and the prognosis is guarded, with rates of return to soundness ranging from 27% 1,5 to 81%. 2 Infection results from traumatic perforation, arthrocentesis, or local or hematogenous

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research