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, accounting for the mydriasis and vestibular signs, respectively, noted on neurologic examination. The mechanism of infection was not identified; no wounds were identified around the head, and there was no evidence of nasal or otic disease or systemic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

nasal cavity. 1 The metastatic lesions of localized HS are usually found in the regional lymph nodes associated with the primary mass. Disseminated HS is an aggressive multisystemic form of this disease that affects lung, spleen, liver, bone marrow, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dogs of any breed, age, or sex, although it is most common in dogs that are sexually mature and between 2 and 5 years of age. It can affect most organs, including the oral and nasal mucosa, dermis, rectum, and intra-abdominal organs. 3–5 However, it

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

septic meningoencephalitis secondary to dorsal rhinotomy and nasal polypectomy . J Am Vet Med Assoc 2006 ; 229 : 240 – 245 . 10.2460/javma.229.2.240 2. Garosi LS , Penderis J , Brearley MJ , et al. Intraventricular tension pneumocephalus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

on the ventrodorsal view, summating with the nasal septum on the dorsoventral projection. Soft tissue swelling around the margins of the right mandible is noticeable. Figure 2— Same right 30° dorsal-left ventral oblique (A) and dorso-ventral (B

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mucopurulent nasal discharge for a few days preceding onset of the foal's signs. The foal had been previously treated with gentamicin, phenylbutazone, and flunixin meglumine for 3 days, but no improvement in clinical signs was reported. On initial evaluation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

body, and a functional laryngeal abnormality. Radiography of the pharyngeal and laryngeal region was performed ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1— Right lateral radiographic view of the skull and neck from the level of the caudal nasal sinus to C3 of a 5-year

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 2-year-old 4.3-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat was presented with a 2-hour history of acute dyspnea, with no history of cough, sneezing, or nasal discharge. The cat had reportedly become anorectic and lethargic in the 24

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mandible and rostral to the nasal planum is nonradiopaque gauze from surgical preparation. The dog was later sedated, and CT examination of the head was performed by use of a 160-slice, multidetector-row, helical CT scanner b with 0.5-mm-thick slices

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, and electrolyte imbalances were treated supportively with IV administration of fluids and synthetic colloids. The dog continued to have melena following surgery. Three days after surgery, the patient developed tachypnea and dyspnea and required nasal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association