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following appropriate nutritional treatment. Typically, low-voltage QRS complexes in dogs are attributable to pericardial effusion or an increased distance of the heart from the recording electrode leads (eg, as a result of obesity or a large thoracic wall

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Femoral pulses were irregular in rate and intensity. Auscultation revealed muffled heart sounds, and after a lateral thoracic radiographic view was obtained and assessed, pericardial effusion was strongly suspected. Cardiac tamponade was diagnosed on the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was not evident. Heart size and function appeared normal, although mild pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade was noted. Six-lead ECG was performed, and intermittent single atrial premature complexes were identified. Holter monitoring was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, severe biatrial enlargement, and moderate pulmonary hypertension. Thoracic radiography revealed moderate generalized cardiomegaly with caudal vena caval distension and mild pleural effusion. The dog underwent abdominal ultrasonography, which revealed mild

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

's cardiac output given the space-occupying nature of the right atrial mass. Abdominocentesis was performed after echocardiography, and the fluid obtained was consistent with a modified transudate. The cause of the abdominal effusion was assessed to be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/kg/min, IV) was initiated. Focused cardiac ultrasonography revealed thickened left ventricular walls with a reduced left ventricular chamber size, subjectively decreased right atrial and ventricular chamber sizes, and no pericardial effusion. A focused

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.12 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). Five months later, the cat developed bilateral hind limb aortic thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion and was subsequently euthanized. References 1. Gouaux JL Ashman R . Auricular fibrillation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

attempt to determine the source of the murmur and evaluate cardiac chamber sizes after diuresis. Echocardiography revealed mild dilation of all 4 cardiac chambers consistent with volume overload and mild pleural and pericardial effusion; a decrease in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

congestive heart failure with pleural effusion, pulmonary edema, and ascites. Results of an ECG examination indicated progression of the conduction system disease to third-degree AVB. The congestive heart failure was considered secondary to third-degree AVB

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Electrical alternans was likely related to the SVT with phasic aberrant conduction (because no pericardial or pleural effusion was present). The possibility of ventricular tachycardia was considered less likely given the narrow QRS complexes and presence of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association