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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION An 8-year-old Brahman-cross bull was evaluated for left hind limb lameness of 2 months' duration. The lameness was first noticed during a rodeo bucking performance, immediately after the bull appeared to land inappropriately on the affected limb.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination findings revealed left hind limb lameness, ataxia, and left-sided epaxial muscle atrophy. Palpation per rectum along the lumbar portion of the vertebral column revealed evidence of exostosis of the ventral aspect. High-definition infrared thermal imaging revealed a pattern of reduced skin temperature in the area of the left lumbar and gluteal regions suggestive of a disruption in the sympathetic control of peripheral blood flow. Nuclear scintigraphy revealed a focal area of increased radioisotope uptake on the left ventrolateral aspect of the L2–3 intervertebral joint. A presumptive diagnosis of ventrolateral vertebral spondylosis resulting in spinal nerve impingement was made.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME 200 mg of methylprednisolone was epidurally injected at the site of the lesion, and treatment with polysulfated glycosaminoglycans was initiated (500 mg, IM, every 4 days for 7 treatments, then monthly thereafter). The lameness and ataxia observed in the left hind limb resolved within 1 week after treatment began. Subsequently, the bull was discharged from the hospital and was used successfully for semen collection and live-cover breeding.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of thermography for the bull of this report provided additional insight into neurovascular physiologic function that classical imaging modalities are unable to provide and, when combined with nuclear scintigraphy, aided in identifying the most critical lesion in a complex clinical case.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Anesthesia was induced and maintained in 6 Suffolk wethers by continuous iv infusion of guaifenesin (50 mg/ml), ketamine (1 mg/ml), and xylazine (0.1 mg/ml) in 5% dextrose in water (triple drip) to assess the anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects. All sheep were positioned in right lateral recumbency. Dosages of triple drip used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia were 1.2 ± 0.02 ml/kg and 2.6 ml/kg/h, respectively. Lack of gross purposeful movement of sheep to electrical stimulation indicated that analgesia and muscular relaxation induced by triple trip were adequate for surgical procedures. Heart rates and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged from baseline values during a 1-hour period of anesthesia. Arterial blood pressures were measured indirectly, using an inflation cuff placed over the metatarsal artery at the heart level. Significant decrease in arterial partial pressure of O2 (Pao2 ), coupled with an increase in arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Paco2 ), from baseline values was observed throughout the course of the study. Decrease in Pao2 was observed concomitantly with significant (P < 0.05) increase in respiration rate. Changes in arterial blood gas tensions observed in this study were attributed to respiratory depressant effect induced by anesthetic drugs and right-to-left shunting, perfusion/ventilation mismatch, or both caused by right lateral recumbency. Administration of 100% O2 via the endotracheal tube reduced the magnitude of the decrease in Pao2 . All sheep recovered smoothly and stood within 96.3 ± 48.9 minutes after termination of triple drip administration

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association