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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether target values for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices against selected canine pathogens were achievable for pradofloxacin in various canine fluids and leukocytes.

ANIMALS 8 healthy adult hounds (experiments 1 and 2) and 6 healthy adult dogs (experiment 3).

PROCEDURES In 3 experiments, pradofloxacin (3, 6, or 12 mg/kg) and enrofloxacin (5 or 10 mg/kg) were orally administered once a day for 5 days, and blood, interstitial fluid (ISF), and other fluid samples were collected at various points. Sample drug concentrations were measured, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed; then, PK-PD indices (ratios between maximum observed concentration [Cmax] and minimum inhibitory or mutant prevention concentrations) were determined for 7 bacterial species.

RESULTS PK-PD values for pradofloxacin at 3 mg/kg were approximately 5 times as high in leukocyte versus plasma and were lowest in CSF, synovial fluid, and aqueous humor. No significant differences were noted between serum and ISF. Value ratios for serum versus other body fluids were numerically higher for pradofloxacin (vs enrofloxacin) for all fluid types except CSF and aqueous humor. Target PK-PD values were exceeded for pradofloxacin against all 7 bacterial species in leukocytes and against all species except Bacteroides spp in serum and ISF. Enrofloxacin achieved the target Cmax-to-minimum inhibitory concentration ratio against Pasteurella multocida in serum, ISF, and leukocytes and for Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in serum and leukocytes. A Cmax-to-mutant prevention concentration ratio ≥ 1 against Eschericha coli was achieved for pradofloxacin at 6 mg/kg.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These findings supported once-daily oral administration of pradofloxacin to dogs at the currently recommended dose (7.5 mg/kg).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmaceutical characteristics (strength or concentration, accuracy, and precision), physical properties, and bacterial contamination of fluconazole compounded products.

SAMPLE Fluconazole compounded products (30- and 240-mg capsules; 30- and 100-mg/mL oral suspensions) from 4 US veterinary compounding pharmacies.

PROCEDURES Fluconazole compounded products were ordered 3 times from each of 4 pharmacies at 7- or 10-day intervals. Generic fluconazole products (50- and 200-mg tablets; 10- and 40-mg/mL oral suspensions) served as references. Compounded products were evaluated at the time of receipt; suspensions also were evaluated 3 months later and at beyond-use dates. Evaluations included assessments of strength (concentration), accuracy, precision, physical properties, and bacterial contamination. Acceptable accuracy was defined as within ± 10% of the labeled strength (concentration) and acceptable precision as within ± 10%. Fluconazole was quantified by use of high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS Physical characteristics of compounded products differed among pharmacies. Aerobic bacterial cultures yielded negative results. Capsules (30 and 240 mg) had acceptable accuracy (median, 96.3%; range, 87.3% to 135.2%) and precision (mean ± SD, 7.4 ± 6.0%). Suspensions (30 and 100 mg/mL) had poor accuracy (median, 73.8%; range, 53.9% to 95.2%) and precision (mean ± SD, 15.0 ± 6.9%). Accuracy and precision were significantly better for capsules than for suspensions.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Fluconazole compounded products, particularly suspensions, differed in pharmaceutical and physical qualities. Studies to evaluate the impact of inconsistent quality on bioavailability or clinical efficacy of compounded fluconazole products are indicated, and each study should include data on the quality of the compounded product evaluated.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the contribution of gyrA mutation and efflux pumps to fluoroquinolone resistance and multidrug resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from dogs and cats.

Sample Population—536 clinical isolates of E coli.

Procedures—Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for enrofloxacin and 6 other drug classes by use of broth microdilution techniques. Real-time PCR assay was used to determine the mutation in gyrA; Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, an efflux pump inhibitor, was used to examine the contribution of efflux pump overexpression.

Results—The MIC for fluoroquinolones increased in a stepwise fashion and was lowest in the absence of mutations, higher with a single point mutation, and highest with 2 point mutations. Level of resistance in the latter category was high (8 times the breakpoint), but this was associated with expression of the AcrAB efflux pump. Inhibition of the efflux pump resulted in a reduction in the MIC to less than the susceptible breakpoint for isolates with an MIC ≤ 4 mg/L, regardless of the presence of a mutation. The greatest magnitude in MIC decrease (MIC was decreased by a factor of > 67 fold) was for isolates with a single mutation but the greatest absolute decrease in MIC (124 mg/L) was for isolates with 2 mutations. Inhibition of the AcrAB efflux pump in isolates characterized by multidrug resistance decreased the MIC of drugs structurally unrelated to fluoroquinolone.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fluoroquinolone resistance in E coli appeared to be a stepwise phenomenon, with MIC increasing as the number of point mutations in gyrA increased, but high-level resistance and multidrug resistance associated with fluoroquinolone resistance reflected overexpression of the AcrAB efflux pump.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameters of enrofloxacin and a low dose of amikacin administered via regional IV limb perfusion (RILP) in standing horses.

Animals—14 adult horses.

Procedures—Standing horses (7 horses/group) received either enrofloxacin (1.5 mg/kg) or amikacin (250 mg) via RILP (involving tourniquet application) in 1 forelimb. Samples of interstitial fluid (collected via implanted capillary ultrafiltration devices) from the bone marrow (BMIF) of the third metacarpal bone and overlying subcutaneous tissues (STIF), blood, and synovial fluid of the radiocarpal joint were collected prior to (time 0) and at intervals after tourniquet release for determination of drug concentrations. For pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 μg/mL (amikacin) and 0.5 μg/mL (enrofloxacin) were applied.

Results—After RILP with enrofloxacin, 3 horses developed vasculitis. The highest synovial fluid concentrations of enrofloxacin and amikacin were detected at time 0; median values (range) were 13.22 μg/mL (0.254 to 167.9 μg/mL) and 26.2 μg/mL (5.78 to 50.0 μg/mL), respectively. Enrofloxacin concentrations exceeded MIC for approximately 24 hours in STIF and synovial fluid and for 36 hours in BMIF. After perfusion of amikacin, concentrations greater than the MIC were not detected in any samples. Effective therapeutic concentrations of enrofloxacin were attained in all samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses with orthopedic infections, RILP of enrofloxacin (1.5 mg/kg) should be considered as a treatment option. However, care must be taken during administration. A dose of amikacin > 250 mg is recommended to attain effective tissue concentrations via RILP in standing horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research