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  • Author or Editor: Ying Zhao x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of treatment with and without adjuvant radiation therapy on recurrence of ocular and adnexal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at specific anatomic locations in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—91 horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses with histologically confirmed ocular and adnexal SCC evaluated from 1985 to 2002 were reviewed. Sex, breed, age, type of treatment, location, and recurrence of SCC were recorded. Two treatment groups determined by recurrence of SCCs treated with and without adjuvant radiation therapy were established.

Results—The anatomic site with the highest recurrence rate was the limbus (junction of the cornea and sclera) or bulbar conjunctiva (47.7%), independent of treatment group. There was a significant difference in recurrence rates of ocular and adnexal SCCs between the 2 treatment groups, independent of anatomic location. Recurrence rates of SCCs treated with and without adjuvant radiation therapy were 11.9% and 44.1%, respectively. Recurrence rates for SCCs of the eyelid, limbus or bulbar conjunctiva, and cornea treated with adjuvant radiation therapy were significantly different from those for SCCs treated without adjuvant radiation therapy. The most frequently represented anatomic site for ocular and adnexal SCCs was the eyelid (28.7%). Coat color, breed, and the interaction of age and breed had a significant effect on tumor recurrence regardless of treatment type and anatomic location.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ocular and adnexal SCCs treated with adjuvant radiation therapy had a significantly lower recurrence rate, compared with SCCs treated without adjuvant radiation therapy, independent of anatomic location. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1733–1738)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in cyathostome nematodes of horses in the southern United States.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—786 horses on 44 farms and stables in Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, Kentucky, and Louisiana.

Procedure—Fecal egg count (FEC) reduction tests were performed on 44 large farms and stables. Horses on each farm were treated with an oral paste formulation of fenbendazole, oxibendazole, pyrantel pamoate, or ivermectin at recommended label dosages. A mixed linear model was fitted to the percentage reduction in FEC, accounting for differences among farms, states, ages, treatments, and treatment by state interactions.

Results—By use of a conservative measure of resistance (< 80% reduction), the percentage of farms with anthelmintic-resistant cyathostomes was 97.7%, 0%, 53.5%, and 40.5% for fenbendazole, ivermectin, oxibendazole, and pyrantel pamoate, respectively. Mean percentage reductions in FEC for all farms were 24.8%, 99.9%, 73.8%, and 78.6% for fenbendazole, ivermectin, oxibendazole, and pyrantel pamoate, respectively. Pairwise contrasts between states for each treatment revealed that in almost all instances, there were no significant differences in results between states.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The prevalence of resistance found in this study was higher than that reported previously, suggesting that anthelmintic resistance in equine cyathostomes is becoming a major problem. Furthermore, data from these 5 southern states, which are geographically and physiographically distinct, were remarkably similar. This suggests that drug resistance in cyathostomes is highly prevalent throughout the entire southern United States and probably nationwide. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:903–910)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association