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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of ocular administration of ophthalmic 2% dorzolamide hydrochloride solution on aqueous humor flow rate (AHFR) and intraocular pressure (IOP) in clinically normal cats.

Animals—20 clinically normal domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—Following an acclimation period, IOP was measured in each eye of all cats 5 times daily for 3 days to determine baseline values. Fifteen cats received 1 drop of 2% dorzolamide solution and 5 cats received 1 drop of control solution in each eye every 8 hours for 5 days (treatment phase). The IOP of each eye was measured 5 times during each day of the treatment phase. Prior to and after the treatment phase, AHFR in both eyes of each cat was measured via fluorophotometry.

Results—Prior to treatment, AHFR or IOP did not differ between the treatment and control groups. In dorzolamide-treated cats, mean AHFR after the treatment phase (3.47 ± 1.5 μL/min) was significantly lower than the value prior to treatment (5.90 ± 2.2 μL/min) and mean IOP during the treatment phase (11.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg) was significantly lower than the baseline mean IOP (14.9 ± 1.0 mm Hg). In the control group, IOP values did not differ before or during the treatment phase and AHFRs did not differ before and after the treatment phase.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ocular administration of 2% dorzolamide solution significantly decreased AHFR and IOP in clinically normal cats. Application of 2% dorzolamide solution may be an effective treatment in cats with glaucoma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate aqueous humor flow rate in the eyes of clinically normal cats by use of a noninvasive technique successfully used in other species.

Animals—20 domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—1 drop of 10% fluorescein sodium was instilled into both eyes of 5 cats every 5 minutes until 3 drops had been administered. Fluorophotometry was performed at 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 hours after fluorescein application to monitor fluorescein removal and determine aqueous humor flow rate. The 3-drop protocol was used for the remaining 15 cats, and fluorophotometry was performed at 5, 6, 7, and 8 hours after fluorescein application. Aqueous humor flow rates were calculated manually by use of established equations with minor adjustments to constant values to reflect feline anatomic features. Correlation coefficients and slope ratios were calculated to assess the legitimacy of the flow rate data. Paired t tests were calculated to assess for differences between the right and left eyes.

Results—Mean ± SD calculated aqueous humor flow rate in the right, left, and both eyes of the 20 cats was 5.94 ± 2.30 μL/min, 5.05 ± 2.06 μL/min, and 5.51 ± 2.21 μL/min, respectively. Correlation coefficients and slope ratios revealed that the aqueous humor flow rates were accurate. No significant differences in values for the right and left eyes were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Accurate aqueous humor flow values for cats can be determined by use of the fluorophotometric technique evaluated in this study.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess inhibitory effects of orally administered anti-inflammatory medications on paracentesis-induced intraocular inflammation in clinically normal cats.

Animals—30 clinically normal domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—Cats were randomly assigned to a control group and 4 treatment groups. Cats in the treatment groups received an anti-inflammatory medication orally once daily at 7 am (acetylsalicylic acid [40.5 mg/cat], meloxicam [0.1 mg/kg], prednisone [5 mg/cat], or prednisolone [5 mg/cat]) for 5 days beginning 2 days before paracentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) and continuing until 2 days after paracentesis. Paracentesis of the anterior chamber was performed in 1 randomly selected eye of each cat. Fluorophotometry was performed in both eyes of each cat immediately before (time 0) and 6, 24, and 48 hours after paracentesis.

Results—At 24 and 48 hours after paracentesis, fluorescein concentration in the eye subjected to paracentesis in the cats receiving prednisolone was decreased, compared with that in the control cats. At 48 hours, a decrease in the fluorescein concentration was also apparent in the eye subjected to paracentesis in the cats receiving meloxicam, compared with that in the control cats. There was no evidence of treatment effects for acetylsalicylic acid or prednisone. There was no evidence of treatment effects in eyes not subjected to paracentesis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Orally administered prednisolone and meloxicam significantly decreased intraocular inflammation in clinically normal cats with paracentesis-induced BAB breakdown. Oral administration of prednisolone or meloxicam may be an effective treatment for cats with uveitis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research