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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The effects of whole-body potassium depletion induced by food deprivation on plasma, erythrocyte, and middle gluteal muscle K concentrations was quantified in 16 healthy, adult horses before, during, and at the end of a 7-day period of food deprivation during which water and sodium chloride were available ad libitum. Potassium concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

Plasma K concentration remained constant (3.49 ± 0.09 mM K/L of plasma; mean ± sem) throughout the study. Erythrocyte potassium concentration decreased from 93.10 ± 1.94 mM K/L of erythrocytes on day 0 to 88.63 ± 2.39 mM K/L of erythrocytes on day 2 (decrease of 4.8%; P < 0.05) and thereafter did not change. The K concentration of the middle gluteal muscle decreased from 91.06 ± 2.96 μM K/g of muscle (wet weight) to 79.61 ± 2.09 μM K/g of muscle (decrease of 12.6%; P < 0.05) on day 4 and decreased further on day 7 to 73.62 ± 1.85 μM K/g of muscle (decrease of 19.2%; P < 0.05). There was no correlation between the plasma and erythrocyte K concentrations (r = −0.066), the erythrocyte and middle gluteal muscle K concentrations (r = 0.167), or the plasma and middle gluteal muscle potassium concentrations (r = −0.018). The water content of the middle gluteal muscle remained constant (73.23 ± 0.36%) throughout the study.

Erythrocyte membrane potential did not change (−99.26 ± 0.87 mV) during the study, whereas the magnitude of the membrane potential of the middle gluteal muscle decreased from −105.84 ± 1.67 mV on day 0 to −100.93 ± 2.10 mV on day 7 (P < 0.05).

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the predictive ability of a commercially available lateral-flow immunoassay used for determining passive transfer of immunoglobulins in calves.

Animals—204 male Holstein calves ranging from 4 to 8 days old.

Procedure—Serum samples were obtained from each calf. Results of refractometry, zinc sulfate turbidity technique, and the lateral-flow immunoassay were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive ability were calculated on the basis of IgG concentrations determined by turbidimetric immunoassay (TIA).

Results—Mean IgG concentration in the study was 10.9 mg/ml as determined by TIA. Rate of failure of passive transfer in this study population was 56%. Associations between the values for the refractometry and zinc sulfate turbidity techniques were established by regression analysis. Accuracy for the lateral-flow immunoassay, refractometry, and zinc sulfate turbidity methods was 95, 80, and 73%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lateral-flow immunoassay was better at determining the status of passive transfer of immunoglobulins, compared with the refractometry or zinc sulfate turbidity methods. The ability of the lateral-flow immunoassay to provide accurate results should enable clinicians to make immediate management or intervention decisions. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:247–250)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Serum lipoprotein concentrations, routine serum biochemical values, and morphologic changes of the liver were evaluated in cats undergoing weight loss. Food was witheld from 6 obese and 6 control cats for 3 days (days 0 to 2), followed by feeding 50% of previous food intake for 26 days (days 3 to 28). Percutaneous liver biopsy specimens were obtained from all cats on days 0, 7, 14, and 28. Blood samples for serum biochemical analysis and lipoprotein profiles were obtained on days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28. All cats lost weight throughout the study, and none developed signs of clinical illness, including those of idiopathic hepatic lipidosis syndrome. Serum total cholesterol concentrations decreased initially in all cats, but rapidly returned to normal after day 3 in obese cats, suggesting altered cholesterol metabolism during dietary restriction. Low-density lipoprotein concentrations decreased throughout the study in control cats, but were unchanged in obese cats. Examination of liver biopsy specimens from each cat revealed minimal lipid accumulation in all specimens, although some specimens contained hydropic degeneration.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether previous corrective upper airway surgery in brachycephalic dogs would decrease perianesthetic complications in subsequent anesthetic events.

ANIMALS

45 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Brachycephalic dogs undergoing any combination of staphylectomy, nasal alaplasty, or laryngeal sacculectomy that were anesthetized at a later date for additional surgical procedures or imaging from August 2, 2007, to February 8, 2019, had their medical records reviewed during both anesthetic events for signalment, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, perianesthetic drug administration, anesthetic duration, presence and total time of positive-pressure ventilation, procedure invasiveness, and perianesthetic complications such as bradycardia, hypothermia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, vomiting or regurgitation, dysphoria, respiratory distress, hypoxemia, reintubation, and prolonged periods of recovery.

RESULTS

The odds of having complications during the postanesthetic period following subsequent anesthetic events were decreased by 79% in dogs having previous surgical intervention to correct clinical signs of brachycephalic airway syndrome. Intra-anesthetic bradycardia increased the odds of developing a postanesthetic complication by 4.56 times. Every 15-minute increase in anesthetic duration increased the odds of having a postanesthetic complication by 12% and having an intra-anesthetic complication by 11%.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Previous corrective upper airway surgery decreased odds of postanesthetic complications in brachycephalic dogs that underwent subsequent anesthetic events. Findings in this study indicated that corrective upper airway surgery for brachycephalic dogs may reduce postanesthetic complications following subsequent anesthetic events, which may reduce perianesthetic morbidity in patients undergoing multiple surgical or diagnostic imaging procedures.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association