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  • Author or Editor: Takuro Nagahara x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate effects of prednisolone administration on gallbladder emptying rate and gallbladder bile composition in dogs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Prednisolone was administered (2 mg/kg, SC, once daily for 2 weeks) to each dog and tapered over 2 weeks. Gallbladder emptying rate and bile composition were evaluated before and after administration of prednisolone for 2 weeks as well as 1 week after cessation of prednisolone administration.

RESULTS Gallbladder emptying rate decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (median, 27%; range, 0% to 38%), compared with rate before administration (median, 59%; range, 29% to 68%), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 45%; range, 23% to 48%). Gallbladder bile mucin concentration decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (median, 8.8 mg/dL; range, 6.2 to 11.3 mg/dL), compared with concentration before administration (median, 13.1 mg/dL; range, 10.7 to 21.7 mg/dL), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 14.3 mg/dL; range, 9.6 to 26.7 mg/dL). Gallbladder taurochenodeoxycholic acid concentration decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (8.1 mmol/L; range, 6.8 to 15.2 mmol/L), compared with concentration before administration (median, 27.2 mmol/L; range, 22.0 to 31.9 mmol/L), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 26.4 mmol/L; range, 15.1 to 31.5 mmol/L).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A lower gallbladder emptying rate caused by prednisolone administration may be involved in the pathogenesis of gallbladder disease in dogs. Further studies are required to determine the clinical importance of lower gallbladder bile mucin concentrations caused by glucocorticoid administration in the pathogenesis of gallbladder disease in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research