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Summary

The biomechanical strength and stiffness of 3 fixation techniques used to repair acute slipped capital femoral epiphysis were evaluated in bone specimens from immature dogs. A servohydraulic testing machine was used to create slipped capital femoral epiphysis in 9 pairs of femurs by shearing the capital femoral epiphysis along the physis in a craniocaudal direction. The slip was reduced and repaired with 1, 2, or 3 double-pointed, 1.6-mm (0.062-inch) smooth pin(s) and retested. The strength and stiffness of each intact femur (which served as the control) and repaired femur were compared. Results of the study indicated that differences among the failure strengths of 1- and 2-pin fixations and their respective controls were not significant; however, the 3-pin fixation was 29% stronger than its control and was 60 and 45% stronger than the 1- and 2-pin fixations, respectively. One- and 2-pin fixations were 34 and 24% less stiff than their respective controls, whereas the stiffness of the 3-pin fixation was similar to its control. The 2- and 3-pin fixations were 48 and 76% stiffer, respectfully, than the 1-pin fixation, but were not significantly different, compared with each other.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Biomechanical strength and stiffness of 2 fixation treatments used to repair acute slipped capital femoral epiphysis were evaluated in bone specimens from immature dogs. A servohydraulic testing machine was used to create slipped capital femoral epiphysis in 7 pairs of femurs by shearing the capital femoral epiphysis along the physis in a craniocaudal direction. The slip was reduced and repaired with one 3.5-mm-diameter screw placed in lag fashion or 2 double-pointed, 1.6-mm (0.062 inch)-diameter smooth pins and retested. Strength and stiffness of each intact femur (which served as the control) and repaired femur were compared. Results of the study indicated that the failure strength of 2-pin fixation was significantly (P < 0.05) weaker than its control and the 1-screw fixation. There was no significant difference between failure strength of the 1-screw fixation and its control. The stiffness of 1-screw and 2-pin fixations was not significantly different, compared with each other, but was significantly (P < 0.05) less, compared with their respective controls.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research