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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of recombinant equine IL-1β on function of equine endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in vitro.

SAMPLE

ECFCs derived from peripheral blood samples of 3 healthy adult geldings.

PROCEDURES

Function testing was performed to assess in vitro wound healing, tubule formation, cell adhesion, and uptake of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′ tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate–labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL) by cultured ECFCs. Cell proliferation was determined by 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay. Effects on function test results of different concentrations and exposure times of recombinant equine IL-1β were assessed.

RESULTS

Challenge of cultured ECFCs with IL-1β for 48 hours inhibited tubule formation. Continuous challenge (54 hours) with IL-1β in the wound healing assay reduced gap closure. The IL-1β exposure did not significantly affect ECFC adhesion, DiI-Ac-LDL uptake, or ECFC proliferation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

These results suggested a role for IL-1β in the inhibition of ECFC function in vitro. Functional changes in ECFCs following challenge with IL-1β did not appear to be due to changes in cell proliferative capacity. These findings have implications for designing microenvironments for and optimizing therapeutic effects of ECFCs used to treat ischemic diseases in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam in serum and CSF of cats after oral administration of extended-release (ER) levetiracetam.

ANIMALS

9 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats received 1 dose of a commercially available ER levetiracetam product (500 mg, PO). Thirteen blood and 10 CSF samples were collected over a 24-hour period for pharmacokinetic analysis. After 1 week, cats received 1 dose of a compounded ER levetiracetam formulation (500 mg, PO), and samples were obtained at the same times for analysis.

RESULTS

CSF concentrations of levetiracetam closely paralleled serum concentrations. There were significant differences between the commercially available product and the compounded formulation for mean ± SD serum maximum concentration (Cmax; 126 ± 33 μg/mL and 169 ± 51 μg/mL, respectively), Cmax corrected for dose (0.83 ± 0.10 μg/mL/mg and 1.10 ± 0.28 μg/mL/mg, respectively), and time to Cmax (5.1 ± 1.6 hours and 3.1 ± 1.5 hours, respectively). Half-life for the commercially available product and compounded formulation of ER levetiracetam was 4.3 ± 2.0 hours and 5.0 ± 1.6 hours, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The commercially available product and compounded formulation of ER levetiracetam both maintained concentrations in healthy cats 12 hours after oral administration that have been found to be therapeutic in humans (ie, 5 μg/mL). Results of this study supported dosing intervals of 12 hours, and potentially 24 hours, for oral administration of ER levetiracetam to cats. Monitoring of serum concentrations of levetiracetam can be used as an accurate representation of levetiracetam concentrations in CSF of cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses.

SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses.

PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1’-dioctadecyl-3,3,3’,3’-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate–labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry.

RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research