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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of bilateral ventriculocordectomy via ventral laryngotomy on laryngeal airway resistance (LAR) in canine cadaver larynges.

SAMPLE 6 clinically normal canine cadaver larynges.

PROCEDURES LAR was determined for each specimen before (baseline) and after bilateral ventriculocordectomy with the epiglottis open and closed. After ventral laryngotomy was performed, the vocal cords were sharply excised, and the incised mucosal edges were apposed with 4-0 glycomer 631 suture in a simple continuous pattern. The thyroid cartilage was apposed with 3-0 polypropylene suture in a simple continuous pattern.

RESULTS With the epiglottis closed, baseline median LAR was 27.6 cm H2O/L/s (range, 21.2 to 30.6 cm H2O/L/s), which did not differ significantly from the median LAR after bilateral ventriculocordectomy (24.7 cm H2O/L/s [range, 20.6 to 27.7 cm H2O/L/s]). With the epiglottis open, baseline median LAR was 7.3 cm H2O/L/s (range, 5.4 to 7.8 cm H2O/L/s), which did not differ significantly from the median LAR after bilateral ventriculocordectomy (7.2 cm H2O/L/s [range, 6.6 to 7.6 cm H2O/L/s]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Bilateral ventriculocordectomy did not affect LAR with an open epiglottis in canine cadaver larynges. Therefore, it may not be an effective treatment for laryngeal paralysis. It also did not affect LAR with a closed epiglottis, which may indicate protection against aspiration pneumonia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare security of continuous intradermal suture lines closed by use of barbed suture with 3 end-pass configurations or without an end-pass configuration.

SAMPLE 40 full-thickness, 4-cm-long, parasagittal wounds in canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES Each continuous intradermal closure was terminated with 1 of 3 end-pass techniques or without an end-pass configuration (control group). A servohydraulic machine applied tensile load perpendicular to the long axis of the suture line. A load-displacement curve was generated for each sample; maximum load, displacement, stiffness, mode of construct failure, and load at first suture slippage at termination (ie, terminal end of the suture line) were recorded.

RESULTS Values for maximum load, displacement, and stiffness did not differ significantly among the 3 end-pass techniques, and load at first suture slippage at termination was not significantly different among the 4 groups. A 1-pass technique slipped in 5 of 9 samples; 3 of these 5 slips caused failure of wound closure. A 2-pass technique slipped in 3 of 9 samples, none of which caused failure of wound closure. Another 2-pass technique slipped in 4 of 10 samples; 2 of these 4 slips caused failure of wound closure. The control group had slippage in 10 of 10 samples; 9 of 10 slips caused failure of wound closure

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE An end-pass anchor was necessary to terminate a continuous intradermal suture line, and all 3 end-pass anchor techniques were suitable to prevent wound disruption. The 2-pass technique for which none of the suture slippages caused wound closure failure provided the most reliable configuration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the feasibility of sidestream dark field (SDF) video microscopy for the evaluation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

30 healthy sexually intact female shelter dogs anesthetized for ovariohysterectomy.

PROCEDURES

Preoperative physical and clinicopathologic assessments were performed to confirm health status. Then healthy dogs were anesthetized, and the abdomen was incised at the ventral midline for ovariohysterectomy and jejunal microvasculature evaluation. An SDF video microscope imaged the microvasculature of 2 sites of a portion of the jejunum, and recorded videos were analyzed with software capable of quantitating parameters of microvascular health. Macrovascular parameters (heart rate, respiratory rate, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation) were also recorded during anesthesia.

RESULTS

Quantified jejunal microvascular parameters included valid microvascular density (mean ± SD, 251.72 ± 97.10 μm/mm), RBC-filling percentage (66.96 ± 8.00%), RBC column width (7.11 ± 0.72 μm), and perfused boundary region (2.17 ± 0.42 μm). The perfused boundary region and RBC-filling percentage had a significant negative correlation. Strong to weak positive correlations were noted among the perfused boundary regions of small-, medium-, and large-sized microvessels. No significant correlations were identified between microvascular parameters and age, body weight, preoperative clinicopathologic results, or macrovascular parameters.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Interrogation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs with SDF video microscopy was feasible. Results of this study indicated that SDF video microscopy is worth additional investigation, including interrogation of diseased small intestine in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare initial leak pressure (ILP) between cadaveric canine and synthetic small intestinal segments that did and did not undergo enterotomy.

SAMPLE

Eight 8-cm grossly normal jejunal segments from 1 canine cadaver and eight 8-cm synthetic small intestinal segments.

PROCEDURES

Intestinal segments were randomly assigned to undergo enterotomy (6 cadaveric and 6 synthetic segments) or serve as untreated controls (2 cadaveric and 2 synthetic segments). For segments designated for enterotomy, a 2-cm full-thickness incision was created along the antimesenteric border. The incision was closed in a single layer with 4-0 suture in a simple continuous pattern. Leak testing was performed with intestinal segments occluded at both ends and infused with dilute dye solution (999 mL/h) until the solution was observed leaking from the suture line or serosal tearing occurred. Intraluminal pressure was continuously monitored. The ILP at construct failure was compared between cadaveric and synthetic control segments and between cadaveric and synthetic enterotomy segments.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ILP did not differ significantly between cadaveric (345.11 ± 2.15 mm Hg) and synthetic (329.04 ± 24.69 mm Hg) control segments but was significantly greater for cadaveric enterotomy segments (60.77 ± 15.81 mm Hg), compared with synthetic enterotomy segments (15.03 ± 6.41 mm Hg).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak testing should not be used to assess the accuracy or security of enterotomy suture lines in synthetic intestinal tissue. Synthetic intestinal tissue is best used for students to gain confidence and proficiency in performing enterotomies before performing the procedure on live animals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research