Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Natalia Vapniarsky x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

The concept of a one-health approach in regenerative medicine has gained tremendous momentum in the scientific and public communities in recent years. Knowledge derived from this approach informs innovative biomedical research, clinical trials, and practice. The ultimate goal is to translate regenerative strategies for curing diseases and improving the quality of life in animals and people. Building and fostering strong and enthusiastic interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary collaboration between teams with a wide range of expertise and backgrounds is the cornerstone to the success of the one-health approach and translational sciences. The veterinarian’s role in conducting clinical trials in client-owned animals with naturally occurring diseases is critical and unique as it may potentially inform human clinical trials. The veterinary regenerative medicine and surgery field is on a steep trajectory of discoveries and innovations. This manuscript focuses on oromaxillofacial-region regeneration to exemplify how the concept of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary collaboration and the one-health approach influenced the authors’ work experience at the University of California-Davis.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to characterize the clinical and histopathologic features of oral eosinophilic lesions in cats.

Animals

38 client-owned cats.

METHODS

The medical records database was searched for cats diagnosed with histologically confirmed eosinophilic oral lesions from 1997 to 2022. Information such as medical history, lifestyle factors, clinical presentation, and radiographic and histopathologic features was included for 38 client-owned cats. Response to treatment and long-term follow-up was also recorded.

RESULTS

The most affected site was the tongue, with approximately half of the affected cats showing signs of oral discomfort and difficulty eating or breathing. Ulcerative lesions were common, with two-thirds of patients showing more than 1 site affected. Histological samples had a classic appearance, whereas some had an atypical appearance characterized by degenerate collagen clusters associated with multinucleated giant cells. A significant association between lesion location, clinical signs, and prognosis was also found, with patients with palatal lesions being more likely to show respiratory signs and less likely to respond to treatment. Finally, treatment response was observed in most cases within 2 months of commencing therapy combining antimicrobial, and immunosuppressive treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The results of this study demonstrate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of cases of oral eosinophilic lesions in cats. Additionally, it emphasizes the need for a multimodal approach to treatment which should include antibacterial therapy. Of no less importance is that other systems may be affected in these patients, warranting a multidisciplinary approach to their management.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Determine whether dogs with well-functioning orthopedic metal implants can develop metal reactivity.

SAMPLE

Client-owned dogs that had tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) or total hip replacement (THR) implants for 12 months or more and control dogs with no implants.

PROCEDURES

Lymphocyte transformation testing was performed by exposing peripheral blood lymphocytes to nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), or a combination of these metals. Lymphocyte proliferation was assessed with flow cytometry. Lymphocyte stimulation indexes (SIs) were calculated. A SI > 2 was considered reactive. Median SIs of dogs in response to metal exposure were compared statistically.

RESULTS

Samples from 10 dogs with TPLO, 12 dogs with THR, and 7 control dogs were analyzed. Six dogs out of 22 with metal implants had a reactive SI to 1 or more metals, while 2 of 7 control dogs had a SI > 2 when exposed to nickel only. When all metals were considered, no differences in metal reactivity were found between TPLO, THR, and control groups.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Metal reactivity is present in dogs and can be identified using lymphocyte transformation testing. Reactivity to Ni is present in dogs with and without metal implants. Reactivity to Co and Cr occurs in some dogs with metal implants.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research