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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate a contrast medium that could be used for radiographic and ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine in dogs.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC; 0.5% solution) was combined with iohexol (300 mg of iodine/mL) to yield modified contrast medium (MCM). Dogs were orally administered the first of 3 MCMs (10 mL/kg [9.5 mL of CMC/kg plus 0.5 mL of iohexol/kg]). Radiographic and ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine followed 10 minutes after administration and every 10 minutes thereafter, until MCM was seen within the ascending colon. Minimally, 1 week elapsed between dosing of subsequent MCMs (10 mL/kg [9 mL of CMC/kg plus 1 mL of iohexol/kg and 8.5 mL of CMC/kg plus 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg]) and repeated radiography and ultrasonography.

RESULTS

Radiographic contrast enhancement of the small intestine was best with MCM that combined 8.5 mL of CMC/kg and 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg. Mean small intestinal transit time for all MCMs was 86 minutes. All MCMs did not interfere with ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine and may have improved visualization of the far-field small intestinal walls.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

An MCM that combined 8.5 mL of 0.5% CMC/kg and 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg could be an alternative to barium or iohexol alone for contrast small intestinal radiography in dogs, especially when abdominal ultrasonography is to follow contrast radiography.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the change in the lumbosacral angle (ΔLSA) and conus medullaris (CM) displacement in healthy dogs undergoing dynamic MRI with changes in the posture of their pelvic limbs from neutral posture to flexion or extension posture and to evaluate for potential correlation between ΔLSA and CM displacement.

ANIMALS

9 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs underwent dynamic MRI with their pelvic limbs positioned in neutral, flexion, and extension postures. From T2-weighted sagittal midline plane MRI images, 2 observers measured the lumbosacral angle and CM location in duplicate for each posture for each dog. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed, and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ) was used to assess for potential correlation between ΔLSA and CM displacement for changes in pelvic limb posture from neutral to flexion or extension.

RESULTS

Overall, the mean ΔLSA and CM displacement for changes in posture were 23° and 9.09 mm (caudal displacement) for the change from neutral to flexion posture, 8.4° and −2.5 mm (cranial displacement) for the change from neutral to extension posture, and 32.2° and 11.64 mm (caudal displacement) for the change from extension to flexion posture. The ΔLSA strongly correlated (ρ = 0.705; 95% CI, 0.434 to 0.859) with displacement of the CM.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The use of dynamic MRI, compared with conventional MRI, will better help to characterize clinically normal and abnormal features of the lumbosacral region of the vertebral column and associated spinal cord during postural changes. Further, when limited translocation of the CM is evident on dynamic MRI, veterinarians should suspect underlying lumbosacral pathophysiologic processes or anatomic abnormalities.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate stiffness of the liver parenchyma in healthy adult cats by means of point shear wave elastography (PSWE).

ANIMALS

18 client-owned adult (1- to 6-year-old) healthy cats.

PROCEDURES

Echogenicity and echotexture of the liver parenchyma were assessed by means of conventional B-mode ultrasonography. The shear wave velocity (Vs) of the right and left portions of the liver were measured by means of PSWE.

RESULTS

B-mode ultrasonography revealed no abnormalities in echotexture or echogenicity of the liver parenchyma in any cat. Mean (95% CI) Vs in the liver parenchyma was 1.46 m/s (1.36 to 1.55 m/s) for the right portion, 1.36 m/s (1.26 to 1.47 m/s) for the left portion, and 1.43 m/s (1.35 to 1.51 m/s) overall. The difference in mean Vs between the 2 portions of the liver was significant. No significant correlation was found between Vs and body weight or between Vs and the depth at which this variable was measured.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Quantitative PSWE of the liver was feasible in healthy adult cats. The obtained values for Vs may be useful for interpretation of and comparison with values measured in cats with liver disease. Additional research is needed to explore the potential usefulness of PSWE for diagnostic purposes.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine computed tomography (CT) delay times by use of a sequential scan and identify the normal enhancement pattern in each phase of a triphasic CT scan of the kidneys in dogs.

Animals—14 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—A sequential CT scan was used for investigating delay time, and a triphasic helical CT scan was used for identifying the normal enhancement pattern and determining Hounsfield unit values in the kidneys of dogs.

Results—In the cine scan (single-slice dynamic scan), the optimal delay times were 10 seconds in the corticomedullary phase and 44 seconds in the nephrographic phase, after contrast medium injection. By use of triphasic CT images, Hounsfield unit values were acquired in each phase.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Triphasic CT of the kidneys in clinically normal dogs was established by acquisition of delay times in a cine scan and may become an important imaging modality in the diagnosis of renal diseases and in treatment planning in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of airway pressure on contrast enhancement and diameter of the pulmonary artery and determine the optimal airway pressure for pulmonary CT angiography in dogs.

ANIMALS

8 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Thoracic CT was performed at end-expiration (0 cm H2O) and 2 positive-pressure end-inspirations (10 and 20 cm H2O). Attenuation curves of enhancement for the sinus of the pulmonary trunk artery were obtained by use of a bolus technique. Contrast medium (300 mg of I/kg) was administered IV, and CT imaging began at the time of peak enhancement. At each pressure, time to peak enhancement, ratio of blood flow from the caudal vena cava to the right side of the heart (KCdVC), and enhancement characteristics and diameter changes of the pulmonary artery were evaluated.

RESULTS

All dogs had a significant delay for time to peak enhancement in the sinus of the pulmonary trunk artery as airway pressure increased. The KCdVC progressively increased as airway pressure increased, and there was low contrast enhancement and increased pulmonary artery filling defects at 20 cm H2O. All pulmonary arteries had marked increases in diameter as pressure increased. Arterial distensibility in the gravity-dependent cranial lung region was greater than that in the gravity-independent caudal lung region at the 2 positive-pressure end-inspirations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Airway pressure affected time to peak enhancement, KCdVC, contrast enhancement, and pulmonary artery diameter. Results suggested that 10 cm H2O could be an optimal pressure for evaluation of the pulmonary artery of dogs by use of CT angiography. (Am J Vet Res 2019;80;756–763)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the feasibility of esophageal insufflation CT (EICT) for evaluation of the esophagus in dogs.

ANIMALS 7 clinically normal adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Each dog was anesthetized twice with 1 week between anesthesia sessions. Dogs were positioned in sternal recumbency during all CT scans. During the first anesthesia session, a CT scan was performed before the esophagus was insufflated (insufflation pressure, 0 mm Hg) and unenhanced and contrast-enhanced EICT scans were performed after CO2 was insufflated into the esophageal lumen to achieve a pressure of 5 mm Hg. For the contrast-enhanced scan, each dog received iohexol (600 mg/kg, IV), and the scan was performed 30 seconds later. During the second anesthesia session, unenhanced and contrast-enhanced EICT scans were performed in the same manner except the insufflation pressure achieved was 10 mm Hg. The esophageal luminal cross-sectional area and wall thickness were measured at each of 5 segments, and mean values were compared among the 3 insufflation pressures and between unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images.

RESULTS Mean esophageal luminal cross-sectional area increased and esophageal wall thickness decreased as insufflation pressure increased. Measurements did not differ significantly between unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images. The stomach became distended with CO2 at an insufflation pressure of 10 mm Hg but not at 5 mm Hg. No adverse effects were observed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested EICT was feasible for esophageal evaluation in dogs. Further research is necessary to determine the optimal insufflation pressure for the procedure and its diagnostic efficacy in diseased patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess effects of catheter diameter and injection rate of flush solution (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) on renal contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with perfluorobutane in dogs.

ANIMALS

5 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

CEUS of the kidneys was performed by IV injection of contrast medium (0.0125 mL/kg) followed by injection of 5 mL of saline solution at rates of 1, 3, and 5 mL/s through a 20-gauge or 24-gauge catheter; thus, CEUS was repeated 3 times for each catheter diameter. Time-intensity curves were created for regions of interest drawn in the renal cortex and medulla. Repeatability was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV). Statistical analysis was used to assess whether perfusion variables or CV of the perfusion variables was associated with catheter diameter or injection rate.

RESULTS

Perfusion variables did not differ significantly between catheter diameters. Time to peak enhancement (TTP) in the renal cortex was affected by injection rate, and there were significantly lower values for TTP at higher injection rates. The CEUS variables with the lowest CVs among injection rates were TTP for the renal cortex; the CV for TTP of the renal cortex was the lowest at an injection rate of 5 mL/s.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of a 24-gauge catheter did not alter CEUS with perfluorobutane; therefore, such catheters could be used for CEUS of the kidneys of small dogs. Moreover, a rate of 5 mL/s is recommended for injection of flush solution to obtain greater accuracy for renal CEUS in Beagles.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine optimal techniques for CT enterography in clinically normal dogs and to evaluate luminal distention after oral administration of lactulose solution as a contrast agent.

ANIMALS 15 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES CT was performed in a control group (2 dogs that underwent CT to evaluate metastasis and 5 other dogs). In a bolus administration group (5 dogs from the control group), lactulose solution (1.34 g/mL) was administered (60 mL/kg) rapidly via gastric tube to anesthetized dogs, and CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. In a continuous administration group of 8 other dogs, lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) was administered slowly via nasoesophageal tube over a period of 45 minutes. Then, 15 minutes after anesthetic induction, CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. Luminal distention of the small intestines was evaluated qualitatively by use of a 3-point scale.

RESULTS All small intestinal segments had poor luminal distention in the control group. The terminal ileum had poor luminal distention for the bolus administration group. Nearly all segments had good luminal distention for the continuous administration group with mild adverse effects. Luminal distention scores from 0 to 20 minutes after lactulose administration were significantly higher than scores from 30 to 60 minutes. Interobserver reproducibility was high for all intestinal segments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CT performed between 0 and 20 minutes after continuous administration of lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) may reveal adequate luminal distention for examination of small intestinal segments in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of color Doppler imaging (CDI) for determining the resistive index (RI) of the medial long posterior ciliary artery (mLPCA) in clinically normal conscious dogs.

Animals—18 (10 sexually intact males, 8 sexually intact females) dogs between 1 and 5 years old.

Procedure—Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed on both eyes with dogs in a sitting position. Each eye was imaged from the region dorsal to the zygomatic arch with the transducer positioned in a horizontal plane. The mLPCA was localized, and RI was calculated from velocities obtained for 3 similar Doppler waveforms. To determine the reproducibility of CDI-derived RI, measurements were repeated twice at a 10-day interval.

Results—Mean (± SD) RI of the mLPCA was 0.68 ± 0.07 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 0.70; n = 36 eyes). Resistive index did not significantly differ between right and left eyes or male and female dogs. In addition, body weight was not correlated with RI. Repeated measurements of RI did not yield significantly different results (interclass correlation coefficient, 0.8297).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Color Doppler imaging appears to be a valid technique for determination of RI of the mLPCA in conscious dogs. This technique may be useful for investigating the pathophysiologic processes of many ocular and orbital vascular disorders in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:211–214)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of thiopental, propofol, and etomidate on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured by the use of dynamic computed tomography in dogs.

Animals—17 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 2 mg of etomidate/kg (n = 5), 6 mg of propofol/kg (7), or 15 mg of thiopental/kg (5) during induction of anesthesia; anesthesia was subsequently maintained by isoflurane evaporated in 100% oxygen. A 1 mL/kg dosage of a 300 mg/mL solution of iohexol was administered at a rate of 3 mL/s during GFR measurement. Regions of interest of the right kidney were manually drawn to exclude vessels and fatty tissues and highlight the abdominal portion of the aorta. Iohexol clearance per unit volume of the kidney was calculated by use of Patlak plot analysis.

Results—Mean ± SD weight-adjusted GFR of the right kidney after induction of anesthesia with thiopental, propofol, and etomidate was 2.04 ± 0.36 mL/min/kg, 2.06 ± 0.29 mL/min/kg, and 2.14 ± 0.43 mL/min/kg, respectively. However, no significant differences in weight-adjusted GFR were detected among the treatment groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results obtained for the measurement of GFR in anesthetized dogs after anesthetic induction with etomidate, propofol, or thiopental and maintenance with isoflurane did not differ significantly. Therefore, etomidate, propofol, or thiopental can be used in anesthesia-induction protocols that involve the use of isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia without adversely affecting GFR measurements obtained by the use of dynamic computed tomography in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research