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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate day-to-day variability in blood glucose curves (BGCs) generated at home and at the clinic for cats with diabetes mellitus.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—7 cats with diabetes mellitus.

Procedures—BGCs generated at home on 2 consecutive days and within 1 week at the clinic were obtained twice. On each occasion, insulin dose, amount of food, and type of food were consistent for all 3 BGCs. Results of curves generated at home were compared with each other and with the corresponding clinic curve.

Results—Differences between blood glucose concentration determined after food was withheld (fasting), nadir concentration, time to nadir concentration, maximum concentration, and mean concentration during 12 hours had high coefficients of variation, as did the difference between fasting blood glucose and nadir concentrations and area under the curve of home curves. Differences between home curve variables were not smaller than those between home and clinic curves, indicating large day-to-day variability in both home and clinic curves. Evaluation of the paired home curves led to the same theoretical recommendation for adjustment of insulin dose on 6 of 14 occasions, and evaluation of home and clinic curves resulted in the same recommendation on 14 of 28 occasions. Four of the 6 paired home curves in cats with good glycemic control and 2 of the 8 paired home curves in cats with poor glycemic control led to the same recommendation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Considerable day-to-day variability was detected in BGCs generated at home. Cats with good glycemic control may have more reproducible curves generated during blood collection at home than cats with poorer control.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare ultrasonographic and histologic examination findings for eyes of animals with ocular diseases.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—116 eyes of 113 animals examined at 2 facilities.

Procedures—Diseased eyes of animals were examined by means of ultrasonography, removed via enucleation or exenteration, then histologically examined. Ultrasonographic images and histopathologic slides were evaluated, and diseases of eyes were identified with each of those methods and allocated to various categories. For each disease category, agreement between results of ultrasonography and those of histologic examination was assessed via determination of κ statistic values.

Results—Tests had good agreement for identification of iris or ciliary body neoplasia. Overall, intraocular neoplasia was not detected via ultrasonography for only 2 of 31 eyes with histologically detected neoplasia. Hemorrhagic or inflammatory changes were misinterpreted as neoplasia for 8 of 37 (22%) eyes. Tests had moderate to acceptable agreement for identification of retinal detachment. Retinal detachment was not detected by means of ultrasonography for 14 of 38 (37%) eyes with that diagnosis determined via histologic examination at one of the facilities (primarily in eyes with intraocular hemorrhage); however, retinal detachment was not identified via histologic examination for 6 of 38 (16%) eyes with that diagnosis determined via ultrasonography at the other facility.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Agreement between tests evaluated in this study was clinically satisfactory for identification of intraocular neoplasia. Typically, diseases were misdiagnosed via ultrasonography for eyes with poor image contrast. Because determination of ultrasonographic diagnoses of retinal detachment and intraocular neoplasm may be of prognostic importance, performance of additional ultrasonographic techniques may be indicated.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association