Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Larie Allen x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Objective

To identify and compare clinicopathologic features between dogs with hepatic microvascular dysplasia (HMD) and confirmed portosystemic shunts (PSS) and dogs with HMD alone and to determine whether any discriminating variables can be identified to differentiate the conditions.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

42 dogs with HMD.

Procedure

Medical records of dogs with HMD examined between January 1991 and October 1996 at 3 veterinary hospitals were reviewed.

Results

Compared with dogs with PSS and HMD, dogs with HMD alone were older and had higher values for mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum total protein, albumin, creatinine, cholesterol, BUN, and blood glucose concentrations. Compared with dogs with HMD alone, dogs with PSS and HMD had higher values for pre- and postprandial serum bile acid concentrations, WBC, and serum alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. The most discriminating variables for the 2 conditions were serum postprandial bile acid concentrations, MCV, and serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations.

Clinical Implications

The discriminant variables of postprandial serum bile acid concentrations, MCV, and serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations may be useful in distinguishing between dogs with HMD alone and dogs with PSS and HMD. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:218–220)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare complications and outcome following unilateral, staged bilateral, and single-stage bilateral ventral bulla osteotomy (VBO) in cats.

ANIMALS

282 client-owned cats treated by VBO at 25 veterinary referral and academic hospitals from 2005 through 2016.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of cats were reviewed to collect information on signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic test results, surgical and postoperative management details, complications (anesthetic, surgical, and postoperative), and outcome. Associations were evaluated among selected variables.

RESULTS

Unilateral, staged bilateral, and single-stage bilateral VBO was performed in 211, 7, and 64 cats, respectively, representing 289 separate procedures. Eighteen (9%), 2 (29%), and 30 (47%) of these cats, respectively, had postoperative respiratory complications. Cats treated with single-stage bilateral VBO were significantly more likely to have severe respiratory complications and surgery-related death than cats treated with other VBO procedures. Overall, 68.2% (n = 197) of the 289 procedures were associated with Horner syndrome (19.4% permanently), 30.1% (87) with head tilt (22.1% permanently), 13.5% (39) with facial nerve paralysis (8.0% permanently), and 6.2% (18) with local disease recurrence. Cats with (vs without) Horner syndrome, head tilt, and facial nerve paralysis before VBO had 2.6, 3.3, and 5.6 times the odds, respectively, of having these conditions permanently.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that staged bilateral VBO should be recommended over single-stage bilateral VBO for cats with bilateral middle ear disease. Cats with Horner syndrome, head tilt, and facial nerve paralysis before surgery were more likely to have these conditions permanently following surgery than were cats without these conditions.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association