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Abstract

Objective—To determine characteristics of the inflammatory reaction in the jejunum of horses in response to various mechanical manipulations.

Animals—12 adult warmblood horses without gastrointestinal tract disorders.

Procedures—The proximal aspect of the jejunum in each horse was divided into 5 segments, and the following manipulations were performed: manual emptying, placement of Doyen forceps, enterotomy alone, enterotomy with mucosal abrasion, and serosal abrasion. Jejunum samples were collected before (control), immediately after, and 30 minutes after the end of manipulations and histologically evaluated to determine distribution of neutrophils and eosinophils.

Results—Macroscopically, all manipulations resulted in jejunal hemorrhage and edema. Compared with control samples, neutrophil numbers were significantly higher after manipulations in the serosa (after all manipulation types), circular muscle layer (after manual emptying), submucosa (after placement of Doyen forceps), and mucosa (after all manipulations except enterotomy alone). Eosinophil numbers were significantly higher in the submucosa after mechanical abrasion of the serosa and manual emptying versus control samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated mechanical manipulation of the jejunum resulted in local inflammatory reactions characterized predominantly by infiltration of neutrophils. This could contribute to the development of postoperative ileus or adhesions in horses without macroscopically detectable injury of the jejunum during surgery.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine anatomic reference points for 4 turtle species and to evaluate data on relative anatomic dimensions, signal intensities (SIs), and position of selected organs within the coelomic cavity by use of MRI.

ANIMALS 3 turtle cadavers (1 red-eared slider [Trachemys scripta elegans], 1 yellow-bellied slider [Trachemys scripta scripta], and 1 Coastal plain cooter [Pseudemys concinna floridana]) and 63 live adult turtles (30 red-eared sliders, 20 yellow-bellied sliders, 5 Coastal plain cooters, and 8 hieroglyphic river cooters [Pseudemys concinna hieroglyphica]).

PROCEDURES MRI and necropsy were performed on the 3 turtle cadavers. Physical examination, hematologic evaluation, and whole-body radiography were performed on the 63 live turtles. Turtles were sedated, and MRI in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes was used to measure organ dimensions, position within the coelomic cavity, and SIs. Body positioning after sedation was standardized with the head, neck, limbs, and tail positioned in maximum extension.

RESULTS Measurements of the heart, liver, gallbladder, and kidneys in sagittal, transverse, and dorsal planes; relative position of those organs within the coelom; and SIs of the kidneys and liver were obtained with MRI and provided anatomic data for these 4 turtle species.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE MRI was a valuable tool for determining the position, dimensions, and SIs of selected organs. Measurement of organs in freshwater chelonians was achievable with MRI. Further studies are needed to establish reference values for anatomic structures in turtles. Results reported here may serve as guidelines and aid in clinical interpretation of MRI images for these 4 species.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of a micro-lightguide tissue spectrophotometer for measurement of tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the small and large intestines of horses under anesthesia.

Animals—13 adult horses without gastrointestinal disease.

Procedures—Horses were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency. Ventral midline laparotomy was performed. Intestinal segments were exteriorized to obtain measurements. Spectrophotometric measurements of tissue oxygenation and regional blood flow of the jejunum and pelvic flexure were obtained under various conditions that were considered to have a potential effect on measurement accuracy. In addition, arterial oxygen saturation at the measuring sites was determined by use of pulse oximetry.

Results—12,791 single measurements of oxygen saturation, relative amount of hemoglobin, and blood flow were obtained. Errors occurred in 381 of 12,791 (2.98%) measurements. Most measurement errors occurred when surgical lights were directed at the measuring site; covering the probe with the surgeon's hand did not eliminate this error source. No measurement errors were observed when the probe was positioned on the intestinal wall with room light, at the mesenteric side, or between the mesenteric and antimesenteric side. Values for blood flow had higher variability, and this was most likely caused by motion artifacts of the intestines.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The micro-lightguide spectrophotometry system was easy to use on the small and large intestines of horses and provided rapid evaluation of the microcirculation. Results indicated that measurements should be performed with room light only and intestinal motion should be minimized.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine global and peripheral perfusion and oxygenation during anesthesia with equipotent doses of desflurane and propofol combined with a constant rate infusion of dexmedetomidine in horses.

ANIMALS 6 warmblood horses.

PROCEDURES Horses were premedicated with dexmedetomidine (3.5 μg•kg−1, IV). Anesthesia was induced with propofol or ketamine and maintained with desflurane or propofol (complete crossover design) combined with a constant rate infusion of dexmedetomidine (7 μg•kg−1 •h−1). Microperfusion and oxygenation of the rectal, oral, and esophageal mucosa were measured before and after sedation and during anesthesia at the minimal alveolar concentration and minimal infusion rate. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, cardiac output, and blood gas pressures were recorded during anesthesia.

RESULTS Mean ± SD minimal alveolar concentration and minimal infusion rate were 2.6 ± 0.9% and 0.04 ± 0.01 mg•kg−1 •min−1, respectively. Peripheral microperfusion and oxygenation decreased significantly after dexmedetomidine administration for both treatments. Oxygenation returned to baseline values, whereas tissue microperfusion remained low during anesthesia. There were no differences in peripheral tissue microperfusion and oxygenation between treatments. Cardiac index was significantly higher and systemic vascular resistance was significantly lower for desflurane treatment than for propofol treatment. For the propofol treatment, Pao2 was significantly higher and there was less dead space and venous admixture than for the desflurane treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dexmedetomidine decreased blood flow and oxygen saturation in peripheral tissues. Peripheral tissues were well oxygenated during anesthesia with desflurane and propofol combined with dexmedetomidine, whereas blood flow was reduced.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research