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  • Author or Editor: Joseph L. Gradin x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a nonionic detergent (Triton WR 1339) can be used in cats to assess hepatic secretion of triglyceride.

Animals—28 healthy cats.

Procedure—Triton WR 1339 was administered IV according to the following schedule: 5, 50, 150, and 250 mg/kg of body weight. Control cats did not receive an injection or received 0.9% NaCl or PBS solutions at the same osmolarity and volume as the 250 mg/kg group. Blood samples were collected throughout the 48-hour period after administration for determination of triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations and for RBC morphology and osmotic fragility studies.

Results—Administration of Triton WR 1339 at 150 and 250 mg/kg caused profound hypertriglyceridemia. Triglyceride concentrations increased in a curvilinear fashion for the first 2 hours and remained increased for approximately 24 hours. Area under the time-concentration curve for triglyceride at 5 hours differed significantly among groups. At 12 and 24 hours, cholesterol was significantly higher in cats receiving 250 mg/kg. The most dramatic changes in osmotic fragility and RBC morphology were in cats receiving 250 mg/kg; 1 of these cats developed severe icterus and died 5 days later. Feeding rice and casein before administering Triton WR 1339 at 150 mg/kg did not appear to affect the hypertriglyceridemia response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Triton WR 1339 can be administered IV to cats at a rate of 150 mg/kg to assess hepatic triglyceride secretion, although some cats may have increased RBC osmotic fragility. Higher dosages caused substantial adverse effects, whereas lower dosages did not alter plasma triglyceride concentration. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:941–950)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of dietary n-6 to n-3 fatty acid ratios and α-tocopheryl acetate concentration on immune functions and T cell subpopulations in healthy dogs.

Animals—Thirty-two 7- to 10-year old female Beagles.

Procedure—For 17 weeks, dogs were fed food that contained low (1.4:1) or high (40:1) ratios of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids in combination with 3 concentrations of all rac-α-tocopheryl acetate (low, 17 mg/kg of food; medium, 101 mg/kg; high, 447 mg/kg). Dogs were inoculated twice with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin suspension at 13 and 15 weeks.

Results—After 12 weeks, dogs consuming low concentrations of α-tocopheryl acetate had lower percentages of CD8+ T cells, compared with dogs consuming medium or high α-tocopheryl acetate concentrations. Also, dogs consuming low α-tocopheryl acetate concentrations had higher CD4+ to CD8+ T cell ratios. On day 4 of week 15, the percentage of CD8+ T cells was highest in dogs fed medium concentrations of α-tocopheryl acetate, compared with other dogs; however, the CD4+ to CD8+ T cell ratio was higher only in dogs fed low concentrations of α- tocopheryl acetate with high concentrations of n-3 fatty acids. Dogs consuming low concentrations of n- 3 fatty acids with medium concentrations of α-tocopheryl acetate had the largest delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An optimum amount of dietary α-tocopheryl acetate concentration, regardless of the dietary n-6 to n-3 fatty acid ratio, stimulates the CD8+ T cell population. Effects of an optimum amount of dietary α-tocopheryl acetate concentration on the DTH response are blunted by dietary n-3 fatty acids. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:762–772)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of dietary n-3 fatty acids from Menhaden fish oil on plasma α-tocopherol concentrations in Beagles.

Animals—32 female Beagles.

Procedure—For 82 days, dogs were fed diets that contained 1 of 2 ratios of n-6:n-3 fatty acids (40:1 [low n-3] and 1.4:1 [high n-3]) and 1 of 3 concentrations of all- rac- α-tocopheryl acetate (low, 17 mg/kg of diet; medium, 101 mg/kg; and high, 447 mg/kg) in a 2 X 3 factorial study.

Results—Diets high in n-3 fatty acids significantly increased total content of n-3 fatty acids in plasma (17.0 g/100 g of fatty acids), compared with low n-3 diets (2.02 g/100 g of fatty acids). Mean ± SEM plasma concentration of cholesterol was significantly lower in dogs consuming high n-3 diets (4.59 ± 0.48 mmol/L), compared with dogs consuming low n-3 diets (5.71 ± 0.48 mmol/L). A significant interaction existed between the ratio for n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and amount of α-tocopheryl acetate in the diet (plasma α-tocopherol concentration expressed on a molar basis), because the plasma concentration of α-tocopherol was higher in dogs consuming low n-3 diets, compared with those consuming high n-3 diets, at the 2 higher amounts of dietary α-tocopheryl acetate. Plasma α-tocopherol concentration expressed relative to total lipid content did not reveal effects of dietary n-3 fatty acids on concentration of α-tocopherol.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Plasma α-tocopherol concentration is not dependent on dietary ratio of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids when α-tocopherol concentration is expressed relative to the total lipid content of plasma. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:104–110)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research