Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jay M. Harrison x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Objective

To identify correlations between ultrasonographic findings and specific hepatic diseases in cats.

Design

Retrospective study.

Sample Population

Medical records of 72 cats with a histopathologic diagnosis of hepatic disease and diagnostic-quality abdominal ultrasonograms between 1985 and 1997.

Procedure

Abdominal ultrasonographic findings in 72 cats with histologically confirmed hepatic disease (hepatic lipidosis excluded) were reviewed. Rather than attempt to combine individual ultrasonographic findings with specific hepatic diseases, 2 classification trees were created as models to correlate certain groups of abnormalities with specific hepatic diseases or with malignant and benign lesions of the liver. Sensitivity and specificity of classification trees were calculated.

Results

Use of a classification tree resulted in correct classification of malignant versus benign hepatic lesions in 88.9% of cats that had hepatic disease (sensitivity, 90.7%; specificity, 86.1 %). Use of a classification tree to distinguish individual types of hepatic diseases resulted in mostly accurate classification of hepatic lymphosarcoma (sensitivity, 70.5%; specificity, 98.2%), cholangitis-cholangiohepatitis syndrome (sensitivity, 87%; specificity, 90%), and benign lesions of the liver (sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 86.4%). Criteria that helped most in differentiating among various hepatic diseases were abnormalities within other organs (spleen, lymph nodes) and appearance of the hepatic portal system. A correlation was not found between focal or multifocal appearance of hepatic lesions and specific hepatic diseases.

Clinical Implications

Use of classification trees to distinguish among specific hepatic diseases or between malignant and benign hepatic lesions provides potentially useful algorithms for ultrasonographic evaluation of cats with hepatic disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:94-98)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine scintigraphic, sonographic, and histologic changes associated with renal autotransplantation in cats.

Animals

7 adult specific-pathogen-free cats: 5 males, 2 females, 1 to 9 years old.

Procedure

Renal autotransplantation was performed by moving a kidney (5 left, 2 right) to the left iliac fossa. Before and at multiple times after surgery, for a total of 28 days, cats were evaluated by B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and renal biopsy.

Results

By 24 hours after surgery, a significant decrease (42%) in mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and an increase in mean renal size (81% increase in cross-sectional area) were evident in the transplanted kidney, compared with preoperative values. By postsurgery day 28, reduction in GFR was 23%. Significant changes in renal blood flow velocity were identified in both kidneys. Consistent changes in resistive index or pulsatility index for either kidney could not be identified. When all postoperative histologic data were combined, the histologic score, indicating degree and numbers of abnormalities detected, for the transplanted kidney was significantly higher than that for the control kidney.

Conclusions

Significant changes in renal function, size, and histologic abnormalities develop secondary to acute tubular necrosis in cats after uncomplicated renal autotransplantation.

Clinical Relevance

Evaluation of renal size and function may be of benefit for clinical evaluation of feline renal transplant patients, whereas measurement of the resistive index may be of little clinical value. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:775–779)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effects of 3 sedative protocols (butorphanol and diazepam [BD] IV; acepromazine and butorphanol [AB] IV; diazepam and ketamine [DK] IV) on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as measured by 99mTc DTPA nuclear scintigraphy and to compare them with GFR measured without sedation. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and sedative effects of each protocol also were measured.

Animals

12 adult male Walker Hounds.

Procedure

Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures and heart and respiratory rates were measured before, during, and after scintigraphic measurement of GFR.

Results

Difference in GFR was not significant between any of the sedative regimens and the control. The DK protocol caused significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure; compared with the AB and BD protocols, it caused significant increases in heart rate versus all protocols, and was associated with the lowest mean GFR (2.80 ml/min/kg of body weight). The AB protocol caused significant decreases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, compared with DK and the nonsedation protocols. Mean GFR for the BD protocol was 2.94 ml/min/kg, and was 3.13 ml/min/kg for the AB and the nonsedation protocols. The AB protocol provided the best sedation with minimal additional restraint required. The BD and nonsedation protocols often were associated with substantial dog movement. The DK protocol induced inadequate duration of immobilization (< 10 minutes) in some dogs and excitement in others.

Conclusion

GFR measurements obtained with any of the sedative protocols were not significantly different, compared with measurements in awake dogs. The AB protocol provides the best sedative effects and was associated with GFR values identical to those in awake dogs. Systemic hypotension caused by acepromazine did not decrease GFR in clinically normal dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:446–450)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research