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Abstract

Objective—To measure strain in the common calcaneal tendon during trotting in dogs and to compare strain before and after immobilization of the tarsal joint.

Animals—6 dogs.

Procedures—A microminiature strain gauge was surgically implanted on the tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyography (EMG) values, percentage strain, and ground reaction forces were measured before and after immobilization. Peak vertical force; vertical impulse; initial, maximum, and final strain; and peak-to-peak EMG amplitude were recorded. Data were analyzed by use of a repeated-measures ANOVA and paired t tests.

Results—Timing of strain data correlated closely with foot strike of the hind limb and EMG activity in all dogs. Maximum tendon strain was simultaneous with peak vertical force. Continued muscle contraction was evident after immobilization. There was no significant difference in maximum strain after immobilization, compared with maximum strain during normal motion. Minimum strain, both at the beginning and end of the strain curve, was sig-nificantly decreased for the immobilized state, compared with results for nonimmobilized joints.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Immobilization of the tarsal joint did not eliminate calcaneal tendon strain during weight bearing in dogs. Decreased isometric muscle contraction during the swing phase of the gait could account for smaller minimum strain in immobilized joints. Immobilization is frequently applied after Achilles tendon rupture to alleviate strain and force on the sutured repair, with possible complications because of the immobilization method. Consideration of these findings could be important in adjusting current treatment recommendations.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess single-day and multiday repeatability of weight distribution (stance) data obtained with a commercial analyzer for dogs with naturally occurring hind limb lameness.

ANIMALS

46 dogs (15 and 31 for single-day and multiday trials, respectively).

PROCEDURES

For single-day trials, 5 to 10 measurements/trial were collected to determine body weight (BW), weight distribution on each limb, and forelimb and hind limb symmetry indices (SIs). The dog was removed from the room and returned immediately; 5 trials were performed. For multiday trials, measurements were performed in the same manner on 2 sequential days. Data were compared among trials (single-day measurements) and between days (multiday measurements). Repeatability (correlation coefficients and Lin concordance correlation coefficients [LCCCs]) and variability (coefficients of variation [CVs]) were assessed.

RESULTS

In single-day trials, BW (r = 0.999), weight distribution on the lame hind limb (r = 0.915) and contralateral hind limb (r = 0.948), and hind limb SI (r = 0.964) were each significantly correlated among trials. In multiday trials, BW results were similar; weight distribution on the lame hind limb and contralateral hind limb and hind limb SI were each less closely but still significantly correlated between days. The LCCCs were highest for BW, weight distribution on the contralateral hind limb, and hind limb SI in single-day trials and for BW and weight bearing on the contralateral and lame hind limbs in multiday trials. The CVs were lowest for BW and highest for forelimb SI in both trial types.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The analyzer used allowed repeatable measurement of BW and weight distribution on the hind limbs of dogs with hind limb lameness. Measurement of forelimb stance variables was not repeatable in this group of dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine plasma tramadol concentrations in cats following a single dose of oral and transdermal formulations and the pharmacokinetics for and the concentration of tramadol in the transdermal formulation.

ANIMALS

8 healthy client-owned domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES

1 cat was orally administered 1 dose of tramadol (2 mg/kg), and 7 cats received 1 dose of a proprietary compounded tramadol gel product (median actual dose, 2.8 mg/kg) applied to their inner pinnae. Plasma tramadol concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry at fixed times over 24 hours.

RESULTS

Plasma tramadol concentrations were undetectable or much lower (range, < 1 to 4.3 ng/mL) following application of the transdermal formulation, compared with those following oral administration (maximum plasma tramadol concentration, 261.3 ng/mL [at 4 hours]). Tramadol pharmacokinetics for the transdermal formulation could not be determined. Tramadol concentrations of the transdermal gel product exceeded the estimated label dose in all analyzed gel samples, with concentrations greater than the 90% to 110% United States Pharmacopeia standard for compounded drugs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Application of 1 dose of the proprietary transdermal formulation did not yield clinically relevant plasma tramadol concentrations in cats. Although this proprietary formulation is currently available to prescribing veterinarians, it should be used with caution.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of short-term and prolonged topical instillation of 0.1% diclofenac sodium, 0.5% ketorolac tromethamine, and 0.03% flurbiprofen sodium on corneal sensitivity (CS) in ophthalmologically normal cats.

ANIMALS

12 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 study phases, each cat received 0.1% diclofenac sodium, 0.5% ketorolac tromethamine, 0.03% flurbiprofen sodium, and saline (0.9% NaCl; control) solutions (1 drop [0.05 mL]/eye, q 5 min for 5 treatments) in a randomized order with a 2-day washout period between treatments. For each cat, an esthesiometer was used to measure CS before treatment initiation (baseline) and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the last dose. There was a 2-day washout period between phases. The second phase was similar to the first, except each treatment was administered at a dosage of 1 drop/eye, twice daily for 5 days and CS was measured before treatment initiation and at 15 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after the last dose. The Friedman test was used to evaluate change in CS over time.

RESULTS

None of the 4 treatments had a significant effect on CS over time in either study phase.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that neither short-term nor prolonged topical instillation of 3 NSAID ophthalmic solutions had any effect on the CS of healthy cats. Given potential differences in cyclooxygenase expression between healthy and diseased eyes, further investigation of the effects of topical NSAID instillation in the eyes of cats with ocular surface inflammation is warranted.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure ocular effects (blood-aqueous barrier breakdown and intraocular pressure [IOP]) following aqueocentesis performed with needles of various sizes in dogs.

Animals—28 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—24 dogs underwent unilateral aqueocentesis (24 treated eyes and 24 contra-lateral untreated eyes); 25-, 27-, or 30-gauge needles were used in 3 treatment groups (n = 8/group). Four dogs were untreated controls. Aqueocentesis was performed during sedation and topical anesthesia. Anterior chamber fluorophotometry was performed before and after aqueocentesis on day 1. On days 2 through 5, sedation and fluorophotometry were repeated. Intraocular pressure was measured with a rebound tonometer at multiple time points.

Results—Aqueocentesis resulted in blood-aqueous barrier breakdown detected via fluorophotometry in all treated eyes, with barrier reestablishment by day 5. On day 2, the contralateral untreated eyes of all 3 groups also had significantly increased fluorescence. Use of a 25-gauge needle resulted in a significant increase in treated eyes' anterior chamber fluorescence on days 3 and 5 as well as a significant increase in IOP 20 minutes following aqueocentesis, compared with the other treatment groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Aqueocentesis performed with a 25-gauge needle resulted in the greatest degree of blood-aqueous barrier breakdown and a brief state of intraocular hypertension. Use of a 27- or 30-gauge needle is recommended for aqueous paracentesis. A consensual ocular reaction appeared to occur in dogs following unilateral traumatic blood-aqueous barrier breakdown and may be of clinical importance.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the local and systemic effects of IM implantation of lead shot alternatives in rats.

Animals—22 laboratory rats.

Procedures—Sterile IM implantation of shot metals was performed, with euthanasia and necropsy at 2, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation. Skeletal muscle specimens were examined histologically and kidney specimens were tested for heavy metals. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of corrosion of metals was performed.

Results—Corrosion of susceptible metals was greatest at 2 weeks in vivo and in vitro. Inflammation associated with all pellet types was greatest 2 weeks after implantation. Nickel-plated steel incited significantly greater inflammation at 2 weeks, compared with bismuth alloy. Kidney iron concentration was significantly greater at 26 weeks, compared with other test periods. Local tissue deposition of iron was verified by use of Prussian blue staining for all iron-containing metals. Concentration of arsenic in kidneys was significantly greater at 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation, compared with 2 weeks.

Clinical Relevance and Impact for Human Medicine—Humans or dogs wounded with nickel-plated steel may require more aggressive initial monitoring than those wounded with other shot types. Monitoring of systemic arsenic concentrations may be indicated in patients wounded with shotgun pellets.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate clinical efficacy of hydrocodone-acetaminophen and tramadol for treatment of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Standardized anesthetic and surgical protocols were followed. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive either tramadol hydrochloride (5 to 7 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h; tramadol group) or hydrocodone bitartrate–acetaminophen (0.5 to 0.6 mg of hydrocodone/kg, PO, q 8 h; hydrocodone group) for analgesia after surgery. The modified Glasgow composite measure pain scale was used to assess signs of postoperative pain at predetermined intervals by an investigator who was blinded to treatment group. Scoring commenced with the second dose of the assigned study analgesic. Pain scores and rates of treatment failure (ie, dogs requiring rescue analgesia according to a predetermined protocol) were compared statistically between groups.

RESULTS 12 of 42 (29%; 5/19 in the hydrocodone-acetaminophen group and 7/23 in the tramadol group) dogs required rescue analgesic treatment on the basis of pain scores. Median pain score for the hydrocodone group was significantly lower than that of the tramadol group 2 hours after the second dose of study analgesic. The 2 groups had similar pain scores at all other time points.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall, differences in pain scores between dogs that received hydrocodone-acetaminophen or tramadol were minor. The percentage of dogs with treatment failure in both groups was considered unacceptable.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of hydrocodone (delivered in combination with acetaminophen) and tramadol in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive tramadol hydrochloride (5 to 7 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h; tramadol group) or hydrocodone bitartrate–acetaminophen (0.5 to 0.6 mg of hydrocodone/kg, PO, q 8 h; hydrocodone group) following TPLO with standard anesthetic and surgical protocols. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis of study drugs and their metabolites over an 8-hour period beginning after the second dose of the study medication.

RESULTS The terminal half-life, maximum serum concentration, and time to maximum serum concentration for tramadol following naïve pooled modeling were 1.56 hours, 155.6 ng/mL, and 3.90 hours, respectively. Serum concentrations of the tramadol metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) were low. For hydrocodone, maximum serum concentration determined by naïve pooled modeling was 7.90 ng/mL, and time to maximum serum concentration was 3.47 hours. The terminal half-life for hydrocodone was 15.85 hours, but was likely influenced by delayed drug absorption in some dogs and may not have been a robust estimate. Serum concentrations of hydromorphone were low.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The pharmacokinetics of tramadol and metabolites were similar to those in previous studies. Serum tramadol concentrations varied widely, and concentrations of the active M1 metabolite were low. Metabolism of hydrocodone to hydromorphone in dogs was poor. Further study is warranted to assess variables that affect metabolism and efficacy of these drugs in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effect of topical ophthalmic administration of 0.005% latanoprost solution on aqueous humor flow rate (AHFR) and intraocular pressure (IOP) in ophthalmologically normal dogs.

ANIMALS

12 adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

In a masked crossover design involving two 10-day experimental periods separated by a 7-day washout period, dogs were randomly assigned to first receive latanoprost or artificial tears (control) solution and then the opposite treatment in the later experimental period. Each experimental period was divided into a baseline phase (days 1 to 3), baseline fluorophotometry assessment (day 4), treatment phase (1 drop of latanoprost or artificial tears solution administered twice daily in each eye on days 5 to 9 and once on day 10), and posttreatment fluorophotometry assessment (day 10). Measured fluorescein concentrations were used to calculate baseline and posttreatment AHFRs. The IOP was measured 5 times/d in each eye during baseline and treatment (days 5 to 9) phases.

RESULTS

Mean baseline and posttreatment AHFR values did not differ significantly in either experimental period (latanoprost or control). In the latanoprost period, mean IOP was significantly lower during treatment than at baseline; there was no difference in corresponding IOP values during the control period. In the latanoprost period, mean IOP was significantly higher on the first day of treatment than on subsequent treatment days.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In ophthalmologically normal dogs, topical ophthalmic administration of 0.005% latanoprost solution significantly decreased IOP but did not affect AHFR. Thus, the ocular hypotensive effect of latanoprost did not appear to have been caused by a reduction in aqueous humor production. (Am J Vet Res 2019;80:498–504)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To perform repeated anterior chamber fluorophotometry on both eyes of ophthalmologically normal dogs to measure fluorescein concentrations over a 5-day period and identify any change in the degree of anterior chamber fluorescence over time or difference between eyes.

Animals—9 healthy adult dogs (18 eyes).

Procedures—Each dog received an IV injection of 10% fluorescein solution, and anterior chamber fluorophotometry was performed 1 hour later on both eyes. This procedure was repeated at the same time each day for 5 consecutive days.

Results—A significant increase in fluorescein concentration was evident in the anterior chamber on day 5 in the right eye and days 2, 3, 4, and 5 in the left eye. There was no significant difference in concentration between the left and the right eyes on any day.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The increase in ocular fluorescein concentration in the study dogs was unlikely to be of clinical importance and is only pertinent for subsequent research studies. This is a limitation that should be considered when reporting fluorophotometry data as fluorescein concentration or as change in fluorescein concentration from baseline.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research