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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration could be used to detect gallbladder rupture (GBR) prior to surgery in dogs undergoing cholecystectomy for treatment of gallbladder mucocele (GBM).

ANIMALS

45 dogs that underwent cholecystectomy because of GBM at a companion animal referral hospital from 2017 to 2020.

PROCEDURES

Electronic medical records were reviewed, and dogs were included if serum CRP concentration had been measured within 24 hours prior to cholecystectomy. Dogs were grouped as to whether the gallbladder was found to be ruptured or intact during surgery. Accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration to predict GBR was compared with accuracy of abdominal ultrasonography and other preoperative blood tests.

RESULTS

GBR was present in 15 dogs at the time of surgery. Median preoperative CRP concentration was significantly higher in dogs with GBR (15.1 mg/dL; interquartile range, 7.4 to 16.8 mg/dL) than in dogs with an intact gallbladder (2.65 mg/dL; interquartile range, 0.97 to 13.4 mg/dL). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration to predict GBR were 100%, 67%, and 78%, respectively.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of preoperative CRP concentration provided excellent sensitivity and moderate specificity for detection of GBR in dogs undergoing cholecystectomy because of GBM. Accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration for detection of GBR was not superior to the accuracy of preoperative abdominal ultrasonography. However, when CRP concentration was combined with results of ultrasonography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection of GBR were 100%, 93%, and 96%, respectively.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize clinical features, comorbidities, frequency of bacterial isolation, and survival time in cats with suppurative cholangitis-cholangiohepatitis syndrome (S-CCHS).

ANIMALS

168 client-owned cats with S-CCHS.

PROCEDURES

Data were prospectively (1980 to 2019) collected regarding clinical features, comorbidities, bacterial infection, illness duration, and treatments. Variables were evaluated for associations with survival time.

RESULTS

Median age of cats was 10.0 years, with no breed or sex predilection observed. Common clinical features included hyporexia (82%), hyperbilirubinemia (80%), lethargy (80%), vomiting (80%), jaundice (67%), weight loss (54%), and hypoalbuminemia (50%). Comorbidities included extrahepatic bile duct obstruction (53%), cholelithiasis (42%), cholecystitis (40%), and ductal plate malformation (44%) as well as biopsy-confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (60/68 [88%]) and pancreatitis (41/44 [93%]). Bacterial cultures were commonly positive (69%) despite prebiopsy antimicrobial administration in most cats. Of surgically confirmed choleliths, diagnostic imaging identified only 58%. Among 55 cats with “idiopathic pancreatitis,” 28 (51%) were documented to have transiting choleliths, and 20 had pancreatic biopsies confirming pancreatitis. Cholelithiasis (with or without bile duct obstruction) and cholecystectomy were associated with survival advantages. Survival disadvantages were found for leukocytosis, ≥ 2-fold increased alkaline phosphatase, and hyperbilirubinemia. Cholecystoenterostomy had no survival impact. Cats with ductal plate malformations were significantly younger at diagnosis and death than other cats. Chronic treatments with antimicrobials, S-adenosylmethionine, and ursodeoxycholic acid were common postbiopsy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

S-CCHS in cats was associated with bacterial infection and various comorbidities and may be confused with pancreatitis. Surgically correctable morbidities (ie, cholecystitis, cholecystocholelithiasis) and cholecystectomy provided a significant survival advantage.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the type of atrial fibrillation induced by use of 2 pacing protocols during fentanyl and pentobarbital anesthesia before and after administration of atropine and to determine the organization of electrical activity in the left and right atria during atrial fibrillation in German Shepherd Dogs.

Animals—7 German Shepherd Dogs.

Procedures—Extrastimulus and pacedown protocols were performed before and after atropine administration. Monophasic action potential spectral entropy and mean dominant frequency were calculated during atrial fibrillation.

Results—Atrial fibrillation occurred spontaneously in 6 of 7 dogs. All 7 dogs had atrial fibrillation induced. Sustained atrial fibrillation occurred in 13 of 25 (52%) episodes induced by the extrastimulus protocol and in 2 of 12 episodes of atrial fibrillation induced by pacedown. After atropine administration, sustained atrial fibrillation did not occur, and the duration of the nonsustained atrial fibrillation (6 episodes in 2 dogs of 1 to 26 seconds) was significantly shorter than before atropine administration (25 episodes in 7 dogs of 1 to 474 seconds). The left atrium (3.67 ± 0.08) had lower spectral entropy than the right atrium (3.81 ± 0.03), indicating more electrical organization in the left atrium. The mean dominant frequency was higher in the left atrium in 3 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Atrial fibrillation developed spontaneously and was induced in German Shepherd Dogs under fentanyl and pentobarbital anesthesia. Electrical activity was more organized in the left atrium than in the right atrium as judged by use of spectral entropy.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research