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  • Author or Editor: Ian D. Robertson x
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Abstract

Objective—To indirectly assess the pancreatic response in healthy dogs that were fed diets of different fat compositions with or without supplemental pancreatic enzymes and medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs).

Animals—10 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were fed 4 diets once in random order at 1-week intervals; food was withheld from the dogs for ≥ 12 hours prior to the feeding of each diet. Diets A and B contained 16% and 5% crude fat, respectively; diet C was composed of diet A with pancreatic enzymes; and diet D was composed of diet B with pancreatic enzymes and MCTs. Serum canine trypsin–like immunoreactivity (cTLI) and canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) concentrations were measured before (0 hours) and at 1 to 2 and 6 hours after feeding. Serum gastrin concentration was measured at 0 hours and at 5 to 10 minutes and 1 to 2 hours after feeding. A gastrin assay validation study was performed to confirm accuracy of test results in dogs. Data were analyzed by use of a repeated-measures general ANOVA.

Results—Serum cTLI, cPLI, or gastrin concentrations in the dogs did not differ among the different diets fed, among dogs, or over time. When multiple comparisons were analyzed, diet D caused the least amount of measurable pancreatic response, although this difference was not significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results did not indicate a significant effect of dietary fat content or addition of supplemental MCT oil or pancreatic enzymes in diets on serum cTLI, cPLI, or gastrin concentrations in healthy dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the items (question topics) for a subjective instrument to assess degenerative joint disease (DJD)–associated chronic pain in cats and determine the instrument design most appropriate for use by cat owners.

Animals—100 randomly selected client-owned cats from 6 months to 20 years old.

Procedures—Cats were evaluated to determine degree of radiographic DJD and signs of pain throughout the skeletal system. Two groups were identified: high DJD pain and low DJD pain. Owner-answered questions about activity and signs of pain were compared between the 2 groups to define items relating to chronic DJD pain. Interviews with 45 cat owners were performed to generate items. Fifty-three cat owners who had not been involved in any other part of the study, 19 veterinarians, and 2 statisticians assessed 6 preliminary instrument designs.

Results—22 cats were selected for each group; 19 important items were identified, resulting in 12 potential items for the instrument; and 3 additional items were identified from owner interviews. Owners and veterinarians selected a 5-point descriptive instrument design over 11-point or visual analogue scale formats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Behaviors relating to activity were substantially different between healthy cats and cats with signs of DJD-associated pain. Fifteen items were identified as being potentially useful, and the preferred instrument design was identified. This information could be used to construct an owner-based questionnaire to assess feline DJD-associated pain. Once validated, such a questionnaire would assist in evaluating potential analgesic treatments for these patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research