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  • Author or Editor: Howard J. Lawrence x
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Abstract

Objectives—To describe preoperative, surgical, and postoperative findings and determine prognostic indicators and treatment recommendations in dogs treated surgically for gallbladder mucocele.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—22 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with gallbladder mucoceles that were treated surgically were reviewed. History, clinical signs, results of selected clinicopathologic analyses and abdominal ultrasonography, surgical procedure performed, results of histologic examination of a liver biopsy specimen, and survival time were recorded. Followup information was obtained via telephone interview with owners and referring veterinarians.

Results—Dogs were 7 to 15 years of age and had nonspecific clinical signs (vomiting, anorexia, and lethargy). Physical examination findings included icterus, signs of depression, and signs of discomfort on palpation of the abdomen . Sixteen dogs had a definitive diagnosis and 6 dogs were strongly suspected of having a gallbladder mucocele on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography. Fifteen dogs survived after surgery; 3 of these dogs had bile-induced peritonitis, and 4 had pancreatitis. One dog was euthanatized as a result of severe pancreatitis, and 1 was euthanatized because of acute renal failure; 5 dogs died as a result of pancreatitis, cholecystitis, or bile-induced peritonitis. Hepatic abnormalities were detected histologically in all dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No predictors of survival were identified. No associations between outcome of surgical treatment (survival vs nonsurvival) and preoperative findings, biliary rupture, surgical procedure performed, results of histologic examination of the liver, or development of pancreatitis were found. Cholecystoduodenostomy and cholecystectomy appear to be acceptable treatments for gallbladder mucocele. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1418–1422)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Adrenocortical tumors were diagnosed in 5 adult spayed ferrets. Four ferrets had bilaterally symmetrical alopecia of the caudal femoral region, abdomen, and tail, and 1 had alopecia of the distal limbs and feet. All 5 ferrets had vulvar swelling. During abdominal ultrasonography, irregular masses, believed to involve the adrenal glands, were seen in all 5 ferrets. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed successfully in each ferret by use of ventral midline celiotomy. On histologic examination of biopsy samples, 4 ferrets were found to have adrenocortical adenomas, and 1 ferret was found to have an adrenocortical adenocarcinoma. All clinical signs resolved after adrenalectomy, suggesting that the adrenocortical tumors had been secreting adrenocortical hormones.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Assays were validated for the measurement of urinary concentrations of cortisol and creatinine in domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Urinary concentrations of cortisol and creatinine and the calculated urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio (UCCR) values were determined for 29 clinically normal female ferrets, 22 clinically normal male ferrets, and 12 ferrets with adrenal gland tumors. The UCCR values for the 51 clinically normal ferrets ranged from 0.04 × 10-6 to 1.66 × 10-6, with a median value of 0.22 × 10-6. The UCCR values were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) higher in the 12 ferrets with adrenal tumors, with a range of 0.5 × 10-6 to 60.13 × 10-6 and a median of 5.98 × 10-6. We concluded that determination of UCCR values was useful in the diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism associated with adrenal neoplasia in domestic ferrets.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Four boars intranasally inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus were monitored for 56 days after exposure for changes in semen characteristics and for the presence of virus in the semen. Clinically, 2 of 4 boars had mild respiratory signs of 1 day's duration after infection. Changes in appetite, behavior, or libido were not detected. All boars seroconverted on the indirect fluorescent antibody and serum virus neutralization tests by day 14 after inoculation. Virus was isolated from serum between days 7 and 14 after inoculation. During the monitoring period, semen volume decreased and pH correspondingly increased; however, this change began 7 to 10 days prior to infection. Differences in sperm morphologic features, concentration, or motility between the preinfection and postinfection samples were not observed. The PRRS virus was detected in semen at the first collection in each of the 4 boars (ie, 3 or 5 days after challenge exposure). Virus was detected in nearly all semen samples collected from the 4 infected boars through days 13, 25, 27, and 43, respectively. Neither gross nor microscopic lesions attributable to PRRS virus were observed in tissues collected at the termination of the experiment (day 56), and virus isolation results from reproductive tissues were negative.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association