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  • Author or Editor: H. Jay Harvey x
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SUMMARY

The feasibility of renal arterial infusion of nonbiodegradable microspheres as a model of chronic renal disease in dogs was evaluated. Resin-coated, styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer microspheres were infused into the kidneys of healthy adult Beagles by direct injections of both renal arteries in a single surgical procedure. Injections of 25-μm diameter microspheres had minimal effect on either the clinical status or serum values of the dogs. Histologic examination revealed the majority of the microspheres lodged within the capillary beds of the glomeruli, and little change to the kidneys. However, injections of 50-μm diameter microspheres caused significant increases in serum concentrations of urea nitrogen and creatinine. Histologically, the larger microspheres obstructed afferent arterioles and small arteries, which caused diffuse glomerular necrosis and nephron damage.

With doses ranging from 1 to 3 million microspheres/dog, a correlation between the quantity of microspheres injected and severity of renal damage was observed. The optimal dose for producing a model of moderate renal disease was determined to be 1.8 million microspheres/dog (0.9 million microspheres/kidney).

During long-term studies, microsphere-injected dogs fed a moderately restricted protein ration remained relatively azotemic, compared with control dogs on the identical ration. During the 5-month postsurgical period, the serum urea nitrogen concentration averaged 18.41 ± 1.59 mg/dl (mean ± SE) for the microsphere-injected dogs vs 9.31 ± 0.38 for the control dogs (P < 0.001). Similarly, the mean serum creatinine value was significantly higher (P = 0.020) for the microsphere-injected dogs, compared with the controls (1.28 ± 0.12 mg/dl vs 0.94 ± 0.03). In addition, the difference in mean endogenous creatinine clearance rates was statistically significant (microsphere-injected 1.02 ± 0.05 ml/min/kg, vs control 1.53 ± 0.06, P < 0.001).

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of 2 fractions of inspired oxygen (Fio 2s) during anesthesia on postanesthesia Pao 2 and other measures of oxygen exchange.

ANIMALS 22 healthy adult sexually intact female dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy by ventral midline celiotomy.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either oxygen (Fio 2 > 0.9 [100% oxygen]; n = 11; control group) or a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen (Fio 2 = 0.4; 11; 40% oxygen group) as the carrier gas for isoflurane while anesthetized. All dogs were allowed to breathe spontaneously while anesthetized. For each dog, the Pao 2, Paco 2, other indices of oxygenation, and extent of sedation were monitored at predetermined times during and for 1 hour after anesthesia. Measured variables were compared between the 2 treatment groups and over time within each treatment group.

RESULTS None of the measured variables differed significantly between the control and 40% oxygen groups at any time during the postanesthesia period. Within each treatment group, the Paco 2 and extent of sedation decreased over time during the postanesthesia period.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that indices of oxygenation did not differ significantly between healthy dogs in which the Fio 2 was maintained at > 0.9 and those in which the Fio 2 was maintained at 0.4 while anesthetized for ovariohysterectomy. Thus, the addition of nitrogen to the carrier gas for an inhalant anesthetic conferred neither an advantage nor disadvantage in regard to oxygenation during the first hour of anesthesia recovery.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize clinical features, comorbidities, frequency of bacterial isolation, and survival time in cats with suppurative cholangitis-cholangiohepatitis syndrome (S-CCHS).

ANIMALS

168 client-owned cats with S-CCHS.

PROCEDURES

Data were prospectively (1980 to 2019) collected regarding clinical features, comorbidities, bacterial infection, illness duration, and treatments. Variables were evaluated for associations with survival time.

RESULTS

Median age of cats was 10.0 years, with no breed or sex predilection observed. Common clinical features included hyporexia (82%), hyperbilirubinemia (80%), lethargy (80%), vomiting (80%), jaundice (67%), weight loss (54%), and hypoalbuminemia (50%). Comorbidities included extrahepatic bile duct obstruction (53%), cholelithiasis (42%), cholecystitis (40%), and ductal plate malformation (44%) as well as biopsy-confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (60/68 [88%]) and pancreatitis (41/44 [93%]). Bacterial cultures were commonly positive (69%) despite prebiopsy antimicrobial administration in most cats. Of surgically confirmed choleliths, diagnostic imaging identified only 58%. Among 55 cats with “idiopathic pancreatitis,” 28 (51%) were documented to have transiting choleliths, and 20 had pancreatic biopsies confirming pancreatitis. Cholelithiasis (with or without bile duct obstruction) and cholecystectomy were associated with survival advantages. Survival disadvantages were found for leukocytosis, ≥ 2-fold increased alkaline phosphatase, and hyperbilirubinemia. Cholecystoenterostomy had no survival impact. Cats with ductal plate malformations were significantly younger at diagnosis and death than other cats. Chronic treatments with antimicrobials, S-adenosylmethionine, and ursodeoxycholic acid were common postbiopsy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

S-CCHS in cats was associated with bacterial infection and various comorbidities and may be confused with pancreatitis. Surgically correctable morbidities (ie, cholecystitis, cholecystocholelithiasis) and cholecystectomy provided a significant survival advantage.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine risk, clinical features, and treatment responses for gallbladder disorders in Shetland Sheepdogs.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—38 Shetland Sheepdogs with gallbladder disease.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, history, physical findings, laboratory results, imaging features, coexistent illnesses, histologic findings, treatments, and survival rates.

Results—Mature dogs with gastrointestinal signs were predisposed (odds ratio, 7.2) to gallbladder disorders. Gallbladder mucocele was confirmed in 25 dogs. Concurrent problems included pancreatitis, hyperlipidemia, corticosteroid excess, hypothyroidism, protein-losing nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, cholelithiasis, and gallbladder dysmotility. Mortality rate was 68% with and 32% without bile peritonitis. Nonsurvivors had high WBC and neutrophil count and low potassium concentration. Although preprandial hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and high serum liver enzyme activities were common, gallbladder disease was serendipitously discovered in 11 of 38 dogs. Histologic examination (n = 20 dogs) revealed gallbladder cystic mucosal hyperplasia in 20 dogs, cholecystitis in 16, periportal hepatitis in 9, and vacuolar hepatopathy in 7. Surgery included cholecystectomy (n = 17) and cholecystoenterostomy (4). In 1 hyperlipidemic dog without clinical signs, gallbladder mucocele resolved 6 months after beginning use of a fat-restricted diet and ursodeoxycholic acid.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Shetland Sheepdogs are predisposed to gallbladder disorders, with mucoceles and concurrent dyslipidemia or dysmotility in many affected dogs. Most dogs were without clinical signs during mucocele development. Low survival rate after cholecystectomy in clinically affected dogs suggested that preemptive surgical interventions may be a more appropriate treatment strategy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize the association between peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) or congenital central diaphragmatic hernia (CCDH) and ductal plate malformations (DPMs) in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

18 dogs and 18 cats with PPDH or CCDH and 19 dogs and 18 cats without PPDH or CCDH.

PROCEDURES

Evaluation of clinical details verified PPDH or CCDH and survival times. Histologic features of nonherniated liver samples were used to categorize DPM. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin-19 distinguished bile duct profiles per portal tract and for Ki-67–assessed cholangiocyte proliferation. Histologic features of herniated liver samples from PPDH or CCDH were compared with those of pathological controls (traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, n = 6; liver lobe torsion, 6; ischemic hepatopathy, 2).

RESULTS

DPM occurred in 13 of 18 dogs with the proliferative-like phenotype predominating and in 15 of 18 cats with evenly distributed proliferative-like and Caroli phenotypes. Congenital hepatic fibrosis DPM was noted in 3 dogs and 2 cats and renal DPM in 3 dogs and 3 cats. No signalment, clinical signs, or clinicopathologic features discriminated DPM. Kaplan Meier survival curves were similar in dogs and cats. Bile duct profiles per portal tract in dogs (median, 5.0; range, 1.4 to 100.8) and cats (6.6; 1.9 to 11.0) with congenital diaphragmatic hernias significantly exceeded those in healthy dogs (1.4; 1.2 to 1.6) and cats (2.3; 1.7 to 2.6). Animals with DPM lacked active cholangiocyte proliferation. Histologic features characterizing malformative bile duct profiles yet without biliary proliferation were preserved in herniated liver lobes in animals with DPM.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

DPM was strongly associated with PPDH and CCDH. Because DPM can impact health, awareness of its coexistence with PPDH or CCDH should prompt biopsy of nonherniated liver tissue during surgical correction of PPDH and CCDH.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Long-term follow-up information pertaining to 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone was collected from 17 veterinary institutions. The majority (72.5%) of dogs died or were euthanatized because of problems documented to be related to metastases. The first clinically apparent sites of metastasis were the lungs (60.8% of total), the skeleton (5.2%), or both (4.6%). A Kaplan-Meier survivorship distribution was plotted on the basis of available survival time data in all 162 dogs. The mean and median survival times were estimated to be 19.8 and 19.2 weeks, respectively, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 11.5 and 2.0% respectively.

Statistically significant relationships were not found between survival time and reporting institution, gender, site of primary tumor, whether the primary tumor was proximally or distally located, whether the primary tumor was located in the forelimb or hind limb, whether presurgical biopsy was performed, and whether death was tumor related. A significant (P < 0.01) quadratic relationship was found between age and survival time. Survival time was longest in dogs 7 to 10 years old and was shorter in older and younger dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association