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  • Author or Editor: Gregory D. Sunvold x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare fermentation characteristics of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and other fiber substrates that are commonly found in canine diets.

Sample Population—Fecal samples from 3 adult dogs.

Procedure—The ability of fiber substrates to be used in microbial fermentation reactions was assessed by use of an in vitro fermentation system. Dogs were fed a commercially available food, and feces were collected for use as the microbial inoculum. Substrates used were beet pulp, cellulose, soy fiber, mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), FOS, and 4 inulin products (inulin 1, 2, 3, and 4). Each substrate was incubated anaerobically with fecal inoculum and growth media for 6, 12, and 24 hours, and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) was measured.

Results—Total production of SCFA was higher for fermentation of the 4 inulin products and FOS, whereas fermentation of beet pulp, MOS, and soy fiber resulted in moderate concentrations of SCFA. Fermentation of cellulose produced the lowest concentrations of total SCFA without detection of butyrate or lactate. Butyrate production was greatest for fermentation of the 4 inulin products and FOS. Total lactate production was greatest for FOS and inulin 4. As expected, production of SCFA increased for all substrates as fermentation time increased.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Canine fecal microflora ferment FOS-containing substrates in a similar manner, with little fermentation of cellulosebased carbohydrates. Furthermore, results of an in vitro fermentation system indicate that fiber type affects the metabolic activity of microorganisms, thus influencing the amount and nature of the end products of fermentation. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62: 609–615)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine effects of dietary protein quality (casein [CA] vs corn gluten [CG]) and dietary lipids (corn oil [CO] vs oil blend [OB] rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids [LCPUFAs]) on fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue after weight loss in overweight cats.

Animals—24 ovariohysterectomized adult cats.

Procedure—Cats were allowed ad libitum access to a high-quality diet until they weighed 30% more than their ideal body weight. Cats were then randomly assigned to 1 of 4 weight-reduction diets (6 cats/diet) and were fed 25% of maintenance energy requirements per day. Diets consisted of CG–CO, CA–CO, CG–OB, and CA–OB, respectively, and were fed until cats lost weight and returned to their original lean body mass. Liver biopsy specimens and samples of perirenal, subcutaneous, and abdominal fat were obtained and analyzed for fatty acid content.

Results—Following weight loss, fatty acid composition of the liver and adipose tissue was primarily affected by protein quality in that cats fed CA had significantly higher percentages of 20:4(n-6) and 22:6(n-3) fatty acids than those fed CG. Cats fed the CG–CO diet had the lowest concentrations of LCPUFAs, suggesting that dietary lipids and protein quality each influence fatty acid composition in tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These data provide direct evidence that dietary protein quality alters fatty acid composition of tissues during weight loss in cats. The fatty acid patterns observed suggest that protein quality may alter fatty acid composition through modulation of desaturase activity. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:310–315)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of carnitine (Ca) or taurine (Ta) supplementation on prevention of lipid accumulation in the liver of cats.

Animals—24 adult cats.

Procedure—Cats were fed a weight-gaining diet sufficient in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), low in long-chain n-3 PUFAs (n-3 LPUFA), and containing corn gluten for 20 weeks. Cats gained at least 30% in body weight and were assigned to 4 weight-reduction diets (6 cats/diet) for 7 to 10 weeks (control diet, control plus Ca, control plus Ta, and control plus Ca and Ta).

Results—Hepatic lipids accumulated significantly during weight gain and weight loss but were not altered by Ca or Ta after weight loss. Carnitine significantly increased n-3 and n-6 LPUFAs in hepatic triglycerides, decreased incorporation of 13C palmitate into very-low-density lipoprotein and hepatic triglycerides, and increased plasma ketone bodies. Carnitine also significantly increased weight loss but without altering the fat to lean body mass ratio. Taurine did not significantly affect any variables. Diets low in n-3 LPUFAs predisposed cats to hepatic lipidosis during weight gain, which was further exacerbated during weight loss. Mitochondrial numbers decreased during weight gain and weight loss but were not affected by treatment. Carnitine improved fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization during weight loss without correcting hepatic lipidosis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The primary mechanism leading to hepatic lipidosis in cats appears to be decreased fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine may improve fatty acid oxidation but will not ameliorate hepatic lipidosis in cats fed a diet low in n-3 fatty acids. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1265–1277)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine reference values and test variability for glucose tolerance tests (GTT), insulin tolerance tests (ITT), and insulin sensitivity tests (IST) in cats.

Animals—32 clinically normal cats.

Procedure—GTT, ITT, and IST were performed on consecutive days. Tolerance intervals (ie, reference values) were calculated as means ± 2.397 SD for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, half-life of glucose (T1/2glucose), rate constants for glucose disappearance (Kglucose and Kitt), and insulin sensitivity index (SI). Tests were repeated after 6 weeks in 8 cats to determine test variability.

Results—Reference values for T1/2glucose, Kglucose, and fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations during GTT were 45 to 74 minutes, 0.93 to 1.54 %/min, 37 to 104 mg/dl, and 2.8 to 20.6 µU/ml, respectively. Mean values did not differ between the 2 tests. Coefficients of variation for T1/2glucose, Kglucose, and fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were 20, 20, 11, and 23%, respectively. Reference values for Kitt were 1.14 to 7.3%/min, and for SI were 0.57 to 10.99 × 10-4 min/µU/ml. Mean values did not differ between the 2 tests performed 6 weeks apart. Coefficients of variation for Kitt and SI were 60 and 47%, respectively.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—GTT, ITT, and IST can be performed in cats, using standard protocols. Knowledge of reference values and test variability will enable researchers to better interpret test results for assessment of glucose tolerance, pancreatic β-cell function, and insulin sensitivity in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:630–636)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of dietary lipid and protein on plasma lipoprotein and free fatty acid concentrations and hepatic fatty acid synthesis during weight gain and rapid weight loss in cats.

Animals—24 ovariohysterectomized cats.

Procedure—Cats were fed a high energy diet until they gained 30% of their ideal body weight and then randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 weight reduction diets (6 cats/diet) at 25% of maintenance energy requirements. Diets contained a low or high quality protein source and a lipid source deficient or sufficient in long chain essential fatty acids. Plasma samples and liver biopsy specimens were obtained before and after weight gain and during and after weight loss for determination of free fatty acid, triglyceride, and lipoprotein concentrations. Synthesis of these substances was measured by use of isotope enrichment.

Results—Plasma total cholesterol concentration and concentration of lipoprotein fractions increased after weight gain, compared with baseline values. Weight loss resulted in a significant decrease in concentrations of all lipoprotein fractions except high density lipoprotein. High density lipoprotein concentration was significantly greater in cats fed diets containing an oil blend, compared with cats fed diets containing corn oil. Fatty acid synthesis after weight loss was below the detection limit of the measurement technique.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats undergoing rapid weight loss there is neither increased triglyceride synthesis nor decreased transport of very low density lipoproteins from the liver, suggesting that their involvement in the development of hepatic lipidosis may be minimal. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:566–572)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the influence of dietary supplementation with l-carnitine on metabolic rate, fatty acid oxidation, weight loss, and lean body mass (LBM) in overweight cats undergoing rapid weight reduction.

Animals—32 healthy adult neutered colony-housed cats.

Procedures—Cats fattened through unrestricted ingestion of an energy-dense diet for 6 months were randomly assigned to 4 groups and fed a weight reduction diet supplemented with 0 (control), 50, 100, or 150 μg of carnitine/g of diet (unrestricted for 1 month, then restricted). Measurements included resting energy expenditure, respiratory quotient, daily energy expenditure, LBM, and fatty acid oxidation. Following weight loss, cats were allowed unrestricted feeding of the energy-dense diet to investigate weight gain after test diet cessation.

Results—Median weekly weight loss in all groups was ≥ 1.3%, with no difference among groups in overall or cumulative percentage weight loss. During restricted feeding, the resting energy expenditure-to-LBM ratio was significantly higher in cats that received l-carnitine than in those that received the control diet. Respiratory quotient was significantly lower in each cat that received l-carnitine on day 42, compared with the value before the diet began, and in all cats that received l-carnitine, compared with the control group throughout restricted feeding. A significant increase in palmitate flux rate in cats fed the diet with 150 μg of carnitine/g relative to the flux rate in the control group on day 42 corresponded to significantly increased stoichiometric fat oxidation in the l-carnitine diet group (> 62% vs 14% for the control group). Weight gain (as high as 28%) was evident within 35 days after unrestricted feeding was reintroduced.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dietary l-carnitine supplementation appeared to have a metabolic effect in overweight cats undergoing rapid weight loss that facilitated fatty acid oxidation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of dietary lipid and protein on development of hepatic lipidosis (HL) and on physical and biochemical indices following rapid weight loss in cats.

Animals—24 ovariohysterectomized cats.

Procedure—Cats were fed a high energy diet until they gained 30% of their ideal body weight and then randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 weight-reduction diets (6 cats/diet) at 25% of maintenance energy requirements per day. Diets contained a low or high quality protein source and a lipid source deficient or sufficient in long chain essential fatty acids (LCEFA). Serum and plasma samples and liver biopsy specimens were obtained for biochemical analyses and determination of hepatic lipid content before and after weight gain and during and after weight loss.

Results—Irrespective of weight-reduction diet fed, all cats lost weight at a comparable rate (4.51 to 5.00 g/d/kg of obese body weight). Three cats developed hepatic lipidosis. Significant changes in plasma insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, and serum glucose concentrations were detected after weight gain and weight loss in all diet groups, but values for these variables did not differ among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats can lose 25 to 30% of their obese body weight over 7 to 9 weeks without developing overt clinical signs of HL, provided that weight-reduction diets are highly palatable, contain a high quality protein, have a source of LCEFA, and are fortified with vitamins and microminerals. However, rapid weight loss may increase risk factors associated with development of diabetes mellitus. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:559–565)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research