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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of oral administration of a silibinin-phosphatidylcholine complex (SPC) on oxidative stress in leukocytes and granulocyte function in healthy cats.

Animals—10 purpose-bred adult cats.

Procedures—Cats were administered SPC (10 mg/kg/d) orally for 5 days; blood samples were collected prior to and immediately after the 5-day treatment period. Leukocytes were incubated with monochlorobimane for detection of reduced glutathione (GSH) via flow cytometry. Leukocytes were also incubated with dihydrorhodamine 123 and mixed with Escherichia coli conjugated to a fluorescent marker to measure E coli phagocytosis and the subsequent oxidative burst via flow cytometry. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, along with the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) ratio and a measure of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde concentration [Mmol/L of blood]), were measured spectrophotometrically.

Results—The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), representing GSH content, increased significantly in feline lymphocytes and granulocytes following 5 days of oral administration of SPC. Mean ± SD lymphocyte MFI significantly increased from 27.8 ± 9.0 to 39.6 ± 6.7, and the granulocyte MFI increased from 508.6 ± 135.6 to 612.1 ± 122.9. Following 5 days of SPC administration, the percentage of phagocytic cells that were responding optimally significantly increased (from 37 ± 11.8% to 45 ± 17.5%). Other measures of oxidative stress did not change significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats, oral administration of supplemental SPC appears to increase granulocyte GSH content and phagocytic function, both of which would be potentially beneficial in cats with diseases associated with oxidative stress.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in pH of peritoneal fluid associated with CO2 insufflation during laparoscopy in dogs.

Animals—13 client-owned dogs and 10 purpose-bred teaching dogs.

Procedures—Laparotomy was performed on control dogs; peritoneal fluid pH was mea-sured at time of incision of the abdominal cavity (time 0) and 30 minutes later. Laparoscopic insufflation with CO2 was performed and routine laparoscopic procedures conducted on the teaching dogs. Insufflation pressure was limited to 12 mm Hg. Intraperitoneal fluid pH was measured by use of pH indicator paper at 4 time points. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed at the same time points.

Results—Peritoneal fluid pH did not change significantly between 0 and 30 minutes in the control dogs. For dogs with CO2 insufflation, measurements obtained were a mean of 8.5, 24.5, 44.5, and 72.0 minutes after insufflation. The pH of peritoneal fluid decreased signifi-cantly between the first (7.825 ± 0.350) and second (7.672 ± 0.366) time point. Blood pH decreased significantly between the first (7.343 ± 0.078), third (7.235 ± 0.042), and fourth (7.225 ± 0.038) time points. The PaCO2 increased significantly between the first (39.9 ± 9.8 mm Hg) and fourth (54.6 ± 4.4 mm Hg) time points. Base excess decreased significantly between the first and all subsequent time points.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pneumoperitoneum attributable to CO2 insufflation caused a mild and transient decrease in peritoneal fluid pH in dogs. Changes in peritoneal fluid associated with CO2 insufflation in dogs were similar to those in other animals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced CT for assessment of pancreatic perfusion in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy purpose-bred female Treeing Walker Coonhounds.

PROCEDURES

Contrast-enhanced CT of the cranial part of the abdomen was performed with 3-mm slice thickness. Postprocessing computer software designed for evaluation of human patients was used to calculate perfusion data for the pancreas and liver by use of 3-mm and reformatted 6-mm slices. Differences in perfusion variables between the pancreas and liver and differences in liver-specific data of interest were evaluated with the Friedman test.

RESULTS

Multiple pancreatic perfusion variables were determined, including perfusion, peak enhancement index, time to peak enhancement, and blood volume. The same variables as well as arterial, portal, and total perfusion and hepatic perfusion index were determined for the liver. Values for 6-mm slices appeared similar to those for 3-mm slices. The liver had significantly greater median perfusion and peak enhancement index, compared with the pancreas.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of pancreatic perfusion with contrast-enhanced CT was feasible in this group of dogs. Hepatic arterial and pancreatic perfusion values were similar to previously published findings for dogs, but hepatic portal and hepatic total perfusion measurements were not. These discrepancies might have been attributable to physiologic differences between dogs and people and related limitations of the CT software intended for evaluation of human patients. Further research is warranted to assess reliability of perfusion variables and applicability of the method for assessment of canine patients with pancreatic abnormalities.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate antioxidant capacity and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in horses fed silibinin complexed with phospholipid.

Animals—5 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses consumed increasing orally administered doses of silibinin phospholipid during 4 nonconsecutive weeks (0 mg/kg, 6.5 mg/kg, 13 mg/kg, and 26 mg/kg of body weight, twice daily for 7 days each week). Dose-related changes in plasma antioxidant capacity, peripheral blood cell glutathione concentration and antioxidant enzyme activities, and blood cytokine gene expression were evaluated.

Results—Plasma antioxidant capacity increased throughout the study period with increasing dose. Red blood cell nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase I activity decreased significantly with increasing doses of silibinin phospholipid. No significant differences were identified in glutathione peroxidase activity, reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione concentrations, or expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1, or interleukin-2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Minor alterations in antioxidant capacity of healthy horses that consumed silibinin phospholipid occurred and suggest that further study in horses with liver disease is indicated.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the oral bioavailability, single and multidose pharmacokinetics, and safety of silibinin, a milk thistle derivative, in healthy horses.

Animals—9 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses were initially administered silibinin IV and silibinin phospholipid orally in feed and via nasogastric tube. Five horses then consumed increasing orally administered doses of silibinin phospholipid during 4 nonconsecutive weeks (0 mg/kg, 6.5 mg/kg, 13 mg/kg, and 26 mg/kg of body weight, twice daily for 7 days each week).

Results—Bioavailability of orally administered silibinin phospholipid was 0.6% PO in feed and 2.9% via nasogastric tube. During the multidose phase, silibinin had nonlinear pharmacokinetics. Despite this, silibinin did not accumulate when given twice daily for 7 days at the evaluated doses. Dose-limiting toxicosis was not observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Silibinin phospholipid was safe, although poorly bio-available, in horses. Further study is indicated in horses with hepatic disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the anesthetic-sparing effect of maropitant, a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist, during noxious visceral stimulation of the ovary and ovarian ligament in dogs.

Animals—Eight 1-year-old female dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane. Following instrumentation and stabilization, the right ovary and ovarian ligament were accessed by use of laparoscopy. The ovary was stimulated with a traction force of 6.61 N. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined before and after 2 doses of maropitant.

Results—The sevoflurane MAC value was 2.12 ± 0.4% during stimulation without treatment (control). Administration of maropitant (1 mg/kg, IV, followed by 30 μg/kg/h, IV) decreased the sevoflurane MAC to 1.61 ± 0.4% (24% decrease). A higher maropitant dose (5 mg/kg, IV, followed by 150 μg/kg/h, IV) decreased the MAC to 1.48 ± 0.4% (30% decrease).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Maropitant decreased the anesthetic requirements during visceral stimulation of the ovary and ovarian ligament in dogs. Results suggest the potential role for neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists to manage ovarian and visceral pain.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To increase acidic esophageal lumen pH in dogs that developed gastroesophageal reflux (GER) during anesthesia. We compared water and 2 different bicarbonate concentrations.

ANIMALS

112 healthy, nonbrachycephalic dogs presented for ovariectomy.

PROCEDURES

Following standard anesthesia and surgery protocols for ovariectomy in all dogs, esophageal lumen impedance and pH were monitored using a dedicated probe. Esophageal impedance indicates the presence of GER whereas pH indicates the acidity level. Dogs with strongly acidic GER and an esophageal lumen pH value < 4.0 were included in the study, and lavage was performed with either tap water, bicarbonate 1%, or bicarbonate 2% until the pH increased to > 4.0. The effect of lavage on esophageal pH was compared using the Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon 2 sample tests. Associations between lavage and pH changes were determined.

RESULTS

Of 48/112 dogs with strongly acidic GER, 33% neutralized their esophageal pH during surgery. For the 32 dogs that maintained an esophageal lumen pH value < 4, esophageal lavage with water increased the lumen pH to > 4 in 78.6% of dogs, whereas both bicarbonate concentrations increased it in 100% of the dogs to a more neutral pH (P < .0001). The dogs in the water group were more likely to regurgitate after anesthesia (36% vs 0% in both bicarbonate groups, P = .028).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Bicarbonate 1% and 2% increased esophageal lumen pH to more than 4 after strongly acidic GER. Lavage with water was mildly effective, but required large volumes and predisposed to further regurgitation after anesthesia.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research