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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of maternally derived antibodies on induction of protective immune responses against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type II in young calves vaccinated with a modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type I vaccine.

Design—Blinded controlled challenge study.

Animals—24 neonatal Holstein and Holstein-cross calves that were deprived of maternal colostrum and fed pooled colostrum that contained a high concentration of (n = 6) or no (18) antibodies to BVDV.

Procedure—At 10 to 14 days of age, 6 seropositive and 6 seronegative calves were given a combination vaccine containing modified-live BVDV type I. All calves were kept in isolation for 4.5 months. Six calves of the remaining 12 untreated calves were vaccinated with the same combination vaccine at approximately 4 months of age. Three weeks later, all calves were challenged intranasally with a virulent BVDV type II.

Results—Seronegative unvaccinated calves and seropositive calves that were vaccinated at 2 weeks of age developed severe disease, and 4 calves in each of these groups required euthanasia. Seronegative calves that were vaccinated at 2 weeks or 4 months of age developed only mild or no clinical signs of disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that a single dose of a modified-live BVDV type-I vaccine given at 10 to 14 days of age can protect susceptible young calves from virulent BVDV type II infection for at least 4 months, but high concentrations of BVDV-specific maternally derived antibodies can block the induction of the response. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:351–356)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cefovecin sodium in the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (abscesses and infected wounds).

Design—Multicenter (26 sites), randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial.

Animals—Client-owned cats of any breed with naturally occurring skin infections with associated clinical signs and confirmatory bacteriologic culture results.

Procedures—Cats with clinical signs of skin and soft tissue infection were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of cefovecin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb], SC) followed by placebo drops administered orally once daily for 14 days or 1 SC placebo injection followed by cefadroxil (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb], PO, once daily for 14 days). Only one 14-day treatment course was permitted.

Results—Effectiveness of cefovecin in the treatment of cats with abscesses and infected wounds was similar to that of cefadroxil. At the final assessment on day 28, 97% (86/89) of cefovecin-treated cats and 91% (80/88) of cefadroxil-treated cats were considered treatment successes. There were no serious adverse events or deaths related to treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—1 SC injection of 8 mg of cefovecin/kg for the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (wounds and abscesses) was safe and as effective as cefadroxil administered orally at 22 mg/kg, once daily for 14 days.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association