Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Cyrill Poncet x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the H-pharyngoplasty procedure, report the outcomes of dogs with brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) treated with ala-vestibuloplasty and H-pharyngoplasty with a CO2 laser, and identify prognostic factors.

ANIMALS

423 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs admitted for BOAS from 2011 to 2017 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they were treated with ala-vestibuloplasty and H-pharyngoplasty with a CO2 laser. Signalment, physical examination findings, grades at admission of clinical signs associated with respiratory and digestive systems, diagnostic test results, postoperative treatments, and short-term follow-up results were extracted from medical records. Long-term follow-up of > 12 months was evaluated via questionnaire. Generalized ordered logistic regression was used for bivariable and multivariable analyses.

RESULTS

Overall mortality rate was 2.6%. Median duration of follow-up was 36 months (12 to 91 months), and 341 (80.6%) dog owners completed the questionnaire. Major complications included respiratory distress (2.1%), heatstroke (0.5%), and bronchopneumonia (0.5%). No dogs required revision surgery. Improvement in signs associated with the respiratory and digestive systems was reported in 72% and 34% of the dogs, respectively, and owners’ satisfaction was high (97.1%). Risk of death increased by 29.8% (95% CI, 11.8% to 50.7%) for every 1-year increase in age.

CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

H-pharyngoplasty was possible in all dogs with BOAS, including those previously treated with conventional surgery and was associated with low morbidity and improved respiratory and digestive signs. H-pharyngoplasty combined with ala-vestibuloplasty may be an alternative treatment for even the most severely affected dogs.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the complication rates and outcomes in cats with ureteral obstruction treated by placement of double-pigtail ureteral stents or ureteral bypass (UB) devices.

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS Cats with unilateral or bilateral ureterolithiasis that received double-pigtail ureteral stents (30 stents in 27 cats; stent group) or UB devices (30 devices in 23 cats; UB group).

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to collect data on signalment, clinical signs, serum biochemical data, surgical procedure, duration of hospitalization, complications, and follow-up (≥ 6 months after placement) information. Outcomes were compared between device types.

RESULTS Median durations of surgery and hospitalization were significantly longer in the stent versus UB group. Perioperative mortality rate was 18% (5/27) in the stent group and 13% (3/23) in the UB group. Median survival time was shorter in the stent versus UB group. Stent placement was associated with a greater risk of lower urinary tract–related signs, such as hematuria (52% [14/27]) and pollakiuria or stranguria (48% [13/27]). The risk of device occlusion was also greater in the stent (26% [7/27]) versus UB (4% [1/23]) group. The percentage of cats requiring additional procedures to treat complications was greater in the stent (44%; complications included uroabdomen, stent occlusion, and refractory cystitis) versus UB (9%; complications included UB occlusion and urethral obstruction) group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although the benefits of stent placement in the treatment of ureteral obstruction in cats have been established, results suggested that cats treated with UB devices had a lower risk of complications and a longer survival time than those treated with double-pigtail ureteral stents.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the use of the video telescope operating monitor (VITOM) and use of a conventional unassisted surgical method for treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation in dogs.

ANIMALS

39 dogs with cervical intervertebral disc disease.

METHODS

Prospective study. Dogs were prospectively nonrandomly assigned to either the VITOM (n = 19) or conventional surgery (20) group depending on VITOM system availability. Signalment and preoperative neurologic status were recorded for all dogs. Preoperative and postoperative CT myelography was performed to compare intervertebral space location, spinal cord dimensions at the decompression level, ventral slot dimensions, and residual disc material. Surgical complications and postoperative neurologic outcomes were recorded. Data were compared between the 2 groups using fixed-effects or mixed-effects models to consider double reading of CT myelography images.

RESULTS

No significant differences were noted between the 2 groups regarding the decompression ratio (P = .85), vertebral length body ratio (P = .13), ventral slot width ratio (P = .39), residual disc material (P = .30), and sinus bleeding (P = .12). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups regarding postoperative neurologic grade (P = .17).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

VITOM-assisted ventral slot decompression is equivalent to conventional surgery in treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation in dogs. The use of VITOM remains a good alternative to the conventional surgical method.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association