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  • Author or Editor: Charles C. Dodd x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of a Salmonella Newport siderophore receptor and porin protein (SRP) vaccine on cattle health and performance and on prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella bacteria in feedlot cattle.

Animals—1,591 beef cattle.

Procedures—Cattle were randomly allocated within a replicate (n = 10 replicates [20 total pens]), administered 2 mL of a Salmonella Newport SRP vaccine (n = 795 cattle) or a placebo (796), and revaccinated approximately 21 days after the first administration. Health and performance data were recorded by trained feedlot personnel who were blinded to treatment. Fresh fecal samples (n = 25) were collected from pen floors on days 0, 60, and 120 and within 24 hours of cattle harvest and were subjected to selective Salmonella culture and serotyping by laboratory personnel who were blinded to treatment. Pen-level mixed models were used to analyze data.

Results—Significant differences in fecal prevalence of Salmonella bacteria or health and performance variables were not detected between vaccinated and control cattle. Salmonella bacteria were recovered from all 10 replicates, and cumulative prevalence estimates ranged from 1.5% to 22%. Overall prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella bacteria was 10.2% and 10.9% in vaccinated and control cattle, respectively. Overall morbidity risk was 34.8% for both vaccinated and control cattle. Overall mortality risks were 1.9% and 1.1% for vaccinated and control cattle, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In this setting, administration of the Salmonella Newport SRP vaccine in feedlot cattle had no effect on fecal prevalence of Salmonella bacteria or cattle health and performance.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether treatment with a preparation of Propionibacterium acnes would improve pregnancy and live foal rates in mares with persistent endometritis.

Design—Randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Animals—95 mares with a cytologic diagnosis of persistent endometritis.

Procedures—Mares were treated with P acnes or placebo (both administered IV) on days 0, 2, and 6. No attempt was made to alter additional treatments administered by attending veterinarians. Information on breeding history, physical examination findings, results of cytologic examination and microbial culture of uterine samples, additional treatments administered, breeding dates, results of pregnancy examinations, whether a live foal was produced, and reactions to treatment was recorded.

Results—In multivariate logistic regression models, mare age, year of entry into the study, and first breeding within 8 days after first treatment with P acnes or placebo were significantly associated with pregnancy. Fewer number of cycles bred and younger age were significantly associated with delivery of a live foal in a separate multivariate analysis. Results of multivariate logistic regression modeling indicated that mares treated with P acnes were more likely to become pregnant and to deliver a live foal, compared with placebo-treated controls.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IV administration of P acnes as an adjunct to conventional treatments in mares with a cytologic diagnosis of persistent endometritis improved pregnancy and live foal rates. The optimal effect was detected in mares bred during the interval extending from 2 days before to 8 days after first treatment with P acnes.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association